Lost Your Interviewing Mojo?

by Roberta - 0 Comment(s)

Recently, I talked with a discouraged, unemployed job searcher. She had a wonderful skill set, years of experience, and a sharp resume that was landing her interviews. But things had ground to a halt. What was happening in the interview? Was she too nervous or fidgety? Was she coming across as too desperate? Was she failing to make a connection with the interviewer, or did she need to be more prepared?

Library resources can often help. Interview books are one of the most popular parts of the Calgary Public Library's career collection. Along with sample questions, research strategies, advice on what to wear, and the psychology of the interview process, they offer valuable and often surprising advice. Sometimes, however, mock interviews offer the best opportunities to fine tune the art of the interview.

Alberta Human Services offers a highly regarded, two day workshop Interview Skills Workshop in Calgary, at no cost to job seekers and run by qualified career practitioners. As well as stressing the importance of being properly prepared for an interview, these workshops:

  • review current interviewing theory and selection practices
  • develop increased confidence and comfort with the interview process
  • offer an opportunity to practice interview skills and strategies

 

The Public Library's Career Coaching program also features volunteers that can offer up to 30 minutes of advice and mock interview questions, if the two day course doesn't work for you. As well, Bow Valley College Career Connection hosts in house and library interview workshops on a regular basis.

Job Loss or Job Transition?

by Janice - 0 Comment(s)

So many people in Calgary are in job-hunting mode, either because they've lost a job or because they want a different one. The Job Loss or Job Transition? program is designed to give you the tips you need to deal with loss and move forward in your professional life.

Job Loss or Job Transition?

An interactive workshop intended for those who:

    • Have recently lost their job
    • Are looking for a new job
    • Want to learn how to navigate a volatile job market

This workshop will provide practical tips on:

    • How to recover from job loss
    • Building a job loss action plan
    • How to evaluate new opportunities and job offers
    • Maintaining employment once you have it

 

Saturday, November 24, 2012
11:00 am to 1:00 pm
Central Library, Third Floor (register online or by phone)

 


Presenter Paul Chisholm has worked in Human Resources and staffing for over ten years. Upon completing a Bachelor’s Degree and Diploma in Human Resource Management, Paul began his career as a technical recruiter. Servicing the manufacturing, Oil & Gas and engineering sectors Paul has recruited everything from new graduates to technical specialists to executive managers.

On leaving the staffing business Paul moved into Corporate Human Resources as an in-house recruiter. Dealing with line managers and company executives on a daily basis has provided Paul with an excellent insight into recruitment decisions. Over the years, he's had countless interviews with all levels of candidates, has provided training on interview skills, job search and resume writing. His approach is to provide practical real world advice to those seeking to maximize their job search potential.

WORKshift

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On Friday, November 16th at 11:45, the Central Library is pleased to host Dr. Laura Hambley as she presents on The Psychology of WORKshift, in conjunction with the Career Development Association of Alberta. Learn how employees can have the flexibility to work when and where they are most efficient, and how this relates to career planning . We interviewed Dr. Hambley to get a primer on WORKshift and where it is headed:

Dr. Hambley, I understand the term telecommuting is no longer in vogue, nor best describes this push towards flexible work environments (WORKshift). Is this trend gathering steam in Calgary?

Yes, WORKshift is definitely gaining momentum. I’ve seen interest in and adoption of WORKshift reaching a tipping point in Calgary this past year, having grown significantly since I first began my research in this area in 2004. And not just large organizations are adopting WORKshift, but also small and mid-sized, and both private and public. Not everyone uses the term WORKshift, and we use it synonymously with telework. Organizations sometimes coin their own terms for WORKshift arrangements.

Companies such as TELUS, the City of Calgary, ATB Financial have all embraced this work environment for employees. Do you have a sense of why other companies are more reluctant?

Managerial mindset is one of the biggest barriers we see. Basically, managers believing that their people must be seen to be working. This is known as “presenteeism”, and in actuality a person sitting at a desk does not guarantee they are being as productive as possible!

Do you think companies are worried their employees will be less productive if they are not in the office?

Absolutely. They do not trust people to manage their time and distractions, and to prioritize work appropriately. But this lack of trust is a major issue, as whether one’s team is in or out of the office, trust needs to be there for effective working relationships to happen.

Is WORKshift more popular with women than men? If so, why?

I have not seen differences in numbers of men or women who WORKshift. We do see greater adoption with the younger generations as a trend, which makes sense given increased comfort with technology. We also see certain departments or industries being earlier embracers than others. Not surprisingly, the IT departments tend to pave the way.

Is the prevalence of portable technology making this more feasible?

Absolutely! This article was published recently – it shows what may be coming in the future with the current levels of technological progress. As well, this website also has great information for those wanting to learn more about WORKshift.

Laura has a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology specializing in the human dynamics of virtual leadership/teamwork and WORKshift. She has completed and published extensive research on the critical success factors for effectively leading virtual teams and WORKshifters, has co-authored a book on the topic (Growing the Virtual Workplace, 2008) and her research has also been published and presented at international conferences Laura is an entrepreneur who has helped create The Leadership Store, a Calgary-based leadership consulting firm and founded Calgary Career Counselling. She is also an Adjunct Professor with the Department of Psychology at the University of Calgary.

Beyond Golf

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This week I had the happy pleasure of taking part in a Job Search Boot Camp, sponsored by Alberta Human Services, where I reconnected with local career expert Nell Smith. Poised to start work on a new retirement book for Boomers, she shared the following article she wrote and had been presenting in her workshops. Along with the points below, Nell recommends the books 10 Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me About and You Could Live a Long Time: Are You Ready? for those of you thinking beyond traditional retirement, both available at Calgary Public Library.

There’s more to retirement than golf and travel, the two most common interests of past retirees. Today, boomers and pre-boomers are re-inventing a retirement in which anything is possible. Here, whittled down from over seven decades of life experience, research, and the experiences of family, friends and all those wonderful people who have participated in my career and retirement planning workshops, are my ten best tips for retiring to a life you design, one that is fulfilling and unique to you.

  1. Phase your retirement. Instead of going abruptly from full-time work to full-time leisure, continue to work part-time, do contract, temporary, or casual work. Start a new career, start your own business, or take on a project that interests you.
  2. Know yourself, what is important and what you love. Stay true to who you are. Retire from the inside, out.
  3. Join a group-which is the easiest way to stay socially connected. Fear of social isolation is a common concern for retirees. Could a service or book club be in your future?
  4. Nurture the family relationships and friendships you want to keep; rekindle friendships that have lapsed; let go of friendships that are not in your best interest.
  5. Continue to learn something – a new skill or new knowledge. Learning keeps you mentally alert, interested in the present and future, and interesting to others. Have you always wanted to play the guitar? If not now, then when? Give it a try.
  6. Keep physically active. Go for a daily walk even without a dog. Cycle, swim, run, ski, try line dancing, or walk to your neighbourhood coffee shop.
  7. Volunteer for a cause you believe in, formally or informally, locally or globally. Contribute your skills and wisdom for the greater good of your family, community, or society. Broaden your thinking from “me” to “we” and you will create new meaning and purpose in your life.
  8. Adopt an attitude of gratefulness and compassion towards others. Seek opportunities to express these daily to those whose paths you cross.
  9. Be creative. Yes you can. We are all creative in our own way. Explore in what new ways you want to express your creativity: could it be art, music, inventing, quilting, scrap-booking, gardening, photography, writing, designing, crafting, woodworking, decorating. The possibilities are endless. Explore - give it a try. There’s nothing to lose and who knows what you’ll gain?
  10. Feed your soul: meditate, pray, journal, read spiritual books, be in nature, do yoga, tai chi, listen to music…all great ways to de-stress and just BE. Follow the advice on a bench in Fish Creek Provincial Park that says:

Take the time to sit and ponder; let your mind and spirit wander. Enjoy the view; embrace the day; remember to take the time to play.

 

Nell Smith is a professional retirement planner, career consultant, adult educator, and author who created the Retire to the Life You Design© program that currently operates in four Canadian provinces. Nell is writing a book for boomers on how to re-engage, re-energize, and re-invent their retirement from the inside out.