Get Noticed! Get Hired!

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Get Noticed! Get Hired—Searching For Work Online

The Calgary Public Library has partnered with Alberta Human Services to host Get Noticed! Get Hired—Searching For Work Online, a program featuring a panel discussion of employers, including the City of Calgary, Telus and Devon Energy, will focus on helping job seekers understand the electronic recruitment process and how they can harness the power of social media to help them in their job search. We asked Alberta Human Services a few questions about what will be covered in the program:

What was the impetus for this particular panel program? Are you finding that job seekers are not as up to speed with online job search techniques as they should be?

The Alberta Human Services Business and Industry Team have been discussing the new wave of popularity for recruiters to use social media for active recruitment. We have been getting feedback from both employers and job seekers that these practices may be creating barriers to success in the job search.

TELUS presented a unique opportunity when it offered to do an information session to job seekers on successfully navigating their recruitment site. The Business and Industry Team decided to take a few steps further and develop the panel discussion.

The intent is to give job seekers and career counselors inside information on how to successfully navigate corporate recruitment sites and to increase the effectiveness jobseekers social media profiles.

Are employers using social media and an electronic application process more often? What practical advice would you have for job seekers if so?

A large number of employers/organizations are using electronic application processes and emails for job seekers to apply for openings in their companies. In addition, recruiters are now actively seeking candidate matches for positions through social media sites.

The best advice we would give job seekers is to manage their social media pages and make sure that the content is something they would publish in a newspaper headline.

What is your best tip for job seekers looking to create a robust social media profile?

The one tip the team gives out is to make sure your online social profile describes the type of employee a company would want to hire.

Who will be on the panel? Will the participants have the opportunity to drop off resumes or ask specific questions after the program?

The panel members are Recruitment specialists and HR Managers. As the topic of the discussion is utilizing social media, we expect that job seekers will apply online for opportunities...so no resumes please. The Panel Presentation will have a question and answer segment and we encourage the people attending to ask questions.


We hope you can join us at the Central Library on the morning of Monday, January 28 for Get Noticed! Get Hired—Searching For Work Online.
Contact us at 403-260-2782 or centralinformationservice @ calgarypubliclibrary.com for more information.

Accounting and Finance Job$

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On January 30, 2013, Calgary will be hosting the Accounting and Finance Career and Job Expo with over 45 companies in attendance. We talked with one of the event organizers, Lise Stransky from the Certified General Accountants Association of Alberta (CGA), to find out more about the event and the current state of the finance industry in Alberta:

Lise, there is above average employment growth projected for all major finance related occupations over the next five years. Was this expo organized partly because employers are finding it hard to fill finance related positions?

This is the first time we have organized this event and it is first big event that CGA and CMA (Certified Management Accountants of Alberta) have collaborated on since we merged associations in October. The expo was organized primarily to help our students find positions in order to fulfill their work experience required for designation. This, in turn, helps employers to find qualified accounting and finance professionals for their organizations. Anyone who is interested in positions in the accounting and finance field are invited to attend, whether they have a designation or not. It is an excellent way to do research on current and future opportunities, as well as learn more about getting an accounting designation.

Will companies be looking to hire at this event? Should attendees bring current resumes, or is it more an opportunity to network and learn more about the companies in attendance?

Both! Some companies will be there with an immediate need for candidates to fill current vacant positions. Other companies may not be hiring right now, but are there to source candidates for future positions. It is definitely an opportunity to network and learn more about the companies. Attendees can bring a resume, but they may hear “Apply Online” from many of the organizations in attendance. This can be discouraging, but my advice is – don’t get discouraged! Many organizations have systems in place to collect applications and resumes, so use the expo as an opportunity to gather as much information as possible, in order to create a customized, targeted resume. My advice is to bring a personal business card, and resist the urge to hand in a general resume. Take the opportunity to gather information, and submit a customized resume after the expo.

Lise, we have been told that recent and current education is vital for those in accounting fields, and that if jobs seekers have not taken an accredited course in the past 12 months, it may be a flag to employers. Is that true, and if so, is that the case for most positions in the finance sector?

Most positions in the accounting and finance sector require a designation (CGA, CMA or CA) or a designation in progress. A designation/designation in progress shows potential employers an individual’s commitment to professional development, ethics, trust, integrity and professional competency. For anyone who wants to grow and develop their career in the accounting and finance sector, a designation is essential. If you are looking to hold a position beyond junior level in accounting or financial management, you need an accounting designation.

Besides doing some research on the companies in attendance before the event (at the Library!), is there any advice you have for job seekers to help them make a stand out impression?

In order to prepare our attendees for the Expo, we have been sending them Career Fair Preparation tips. Anyone who registered for the expo has and will receive these tips, and I’ve selected a few as advice to help job seekers make a stand out impression:

  • Career Fair Preparation Tip #1: Know your strengths and skills and be able to talk and write about them. This helps you talk about yourself to employers and construct your resume.
  • Career Expo Preparation Tip #2: Do your research. On yourself. And on the employer. If you are not clear on what YOU have to offer, it will be difficult to convince an employer you have what it takes to work for them. Take some time now to do a self-assessment. Figure out who you are, what you do best, your employability skills and unique traits, the places and environment that give you energy, and the things that motivate you.
  • Career Fair Preparation Tip #3: What should you wear? We recommend business casual or business professional. You will be making a first impression on potential employers – dress the part!
  • Career Fair Preparation Tip #4: Conversation Tips. Have a great professional handshake and make eye contact when introducing yourself. After introducing yourself with your first and last name, exchange business cards with the recruiter. Ask valid questions applicable to the organization or industry. Let the recruiter take the lead in the conversation to avoid sounding as if you are “pitching” (or an annoying know it all).
  • Career Fair Preparation Tip #5: Follow Up after the event. Send a thank you. Follow up with the recruiter within two weeks after the expo. Reflect on your results at the expo. What might you have done more effectively?

Finally (and perhaps most importantly!)…

  • SMILE and BELIEVE in yourself!

STEM careers abound

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On Friday, January 18th at 11:45, the Central Library is pleased to host Where the Jobs Are, in conjunction with the Career Development Association of Alberta. Join Dan Kostka, contributor to Choices Explorer, as he highlights jobs experiencing growth and demand, and discusses some common features of those who've discovered and embraced a good career fit. We chatted with Dan to discuss his perspective:

Dan, you have profiled hundreds of careers for Bridges.com, the company that provides the Calgary Public Library and high schools with the popular career database, Choices Explorer. This company has always excelled at highlighting new and emerging occupations within Canada. What, in your opinion, are some of the careers currently experiencing the biggest demand?

Two broad areas that come immediately to mind are health care and technology. When it comes to health care, it's not just doctors and nurses that are in demand. There are many other positions that require less education, such as personal care aides and medical imaging technicians. These careers are also experiencing large shortages but don't receive as much attention. Many young people aren't even aware that these positions exist, and some require a certificate that can take less than a year to complete.

When I say technology, this applies to the health care field, of course, but also to any career that requires a solid grounding in the sciences. Every time I profile a technology-related career, the people I interview emphasize that in North America we're simply not producing enough graduates in the STEM fields—science, technology, engineering and math. It's simply amazing the number of doors that are open to someone with a solid grounding in the sciences. As with the health care field, technology careers don't necessarily require many years of training. For example, machinists are in great demand and in less than one year a person can get the necessary qualifications for many such positions.

What are some of the key economic and social indicators fueling this growth?

A big factor behind demand in many industries is the aging population. This affects an industry such as the health care field in two ways. First, the number of clients/patients is greatly expanding. Secondly, the practitioners themselves are aging and not enough young practitioners are entering the field to replace them all. This is also true for technology-related careers such as engineering. I recently interviewed a petroleum engineer who said it's common to refer to "The Great Crew Change" in regard to the number of senior workers in that industry who will soon be retiring.

Recent statistics point to the fact that Canadians now have an average of 8 careers in their lifetime. Do you find that people are more willing to take risks and try something new?

I think people's expectations are evolving. Young people no longer expect to stay with the same company for their entire career, or to have just one career. People in mid-career are also more likely to make a change or to have another career on the side. For example, I recently interviewed an energy trader who had a home staging business on the side. The energy trading gave her a good income, while the home staging was an outlet for her creativity (and potentially something that could evolve into a full-time source of income). I think we all want stability in our lives, but how we view it (and how to obtain it) is evolving. In the past, stability meant loyalty to a large organization that would be loyal to us and reward us in return. Now, stability is achieved by keeping our skills current, by having a large personal network, and perhaps by having more than one source of income. Achieving stability in this way requires a more proactive approach to our careers but allows us adapt to the changing marketplace.

A focused, tight resume is still key in landing that dream job. We understand that you have interviewed Martin Yate, the well-heeled author of our very popular Knock 'Em Dead Resumes, one of your favourite books. What advice really stood out for you, given his 25 years in the business?

Yate is a great example of my favourite kind of person to interview—someone who truly loves what he does. His books describe how to go after the job you want by ensuring your resume does its job effectively. But what really struck me in talking with him is how passionate he is about career advising. He used to be in a job that didn't fulfill him at all. When he discovered career advising, he threw himself into it and has become very successful as a result. I think this is inspiring for anyone who hopes to get into a career that utilizes their talents and energizes them.

Dan Kostka, B.A., J.D., is a freelance journalist and lawyer. He has profiled hundreds of careers for Bridges.com, a career exploration site subscribed to by schools across North America.

Finish What You Start

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A hot debate in the career field these days is whether LinkedIn profiles will eventually replace traditional resumes. While that might not happen in the very near future, it's clear that a complete, well written profile is an essential tool for job searchers, and that LinkedIn is increasingly being seen as a valuable under-the-radar recruiting tool. Why, then, do we meet so many people at the Library who open LinkedIn accounts and never complete them or capitalize on their potential?

The most obvious reason is time. Our experience is that it takes a minimum of six to eight hours to get your profile to a point where you wouldn't be nervous if a potential employer had a peek. The other consideration is learning yet another social media platform and understanding all the components. That's why the Library's books on LinkedIn are so popular, along with a multitude of online tutorials, blogs and websites such as Mashable. These sites can help explain features and changes, and offer tips on making your profile stand out and be found,

One of my favourite blogs is Viveka von Rosen's (formerly of Edmonton), who was recently named one of Forbes Top 10 Most Influential Women, and is the author of LinkedIn Marketing: An Hour A Day. She also has a website full of advice, including a recent article featuring her Best 23 LinkedIn Tips. One tip that stands out is her reminder to include all your expertise, publications and certifications in your profile. Many people forget to reflect and look back on all their key training, often because they decide it isn't relevant to include in their resume. But that is the beauty of LinkedIn: it can be a master resume that fully represents all the time and energy you have invested into your life and career.

Overwhelmed? Remember that Calgary Public Library has a variety of programs on LinkedIn, ranging from our popular two hour introduction on social networking and job search, and our more intensive five hour course. Help is always at hand - so finish what you start in 2013.

No More Mediocrity

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How To Ace a "Crazy Good" Interview

The world of interviewing is getting more complicated. In addition to Skype and panel interviews, job searchers now have the added complexity of deep generational gaps and stiff competition during the interview process. How does one stand out in a slew of interviewees, without appearing desperate?

Crazy Good Interviewing, a new, very readable book in the Library's career collection, features some unconventional ideas along with a sound approach towards applying a variety of techniques and skills to help ensure success. Despite the title, the author is not suggesting that wild behavior is in order. Instead, he uses anecdotes and case studies to guide the reader on how to break away from the ordinary and hum drum, and to make a meaningful impression and create "crazy" good connections.

Some highlights include:

1. The Power of Threes, an effective technique for answering an interviewer's open ended questions such as "What relevant experiences have prepared you for the job?"

2. An interviewing model called ACT Out for assessing strengths, communicating verbally and non verbally, and thanking and staying connected to the interviewer

3. Tyes of interviews, including phone, group, and Skype based, along with excellent tips such as remembering to alternate your gaze between the webcam and your computer monitor

The author, John B. Molidor, is the CEO/President for Michigan State University Flint Area Medical Education, and understands how communication styles and interviewing skills can complement each other. Recommended.

Mistletoe and Mingling

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As this is the season to mix and mingle, we are featuring our popular interview from last year with local management consultant Lisa Dare about networking strategies during the holidays. Here is some of what she had to say:

Lisa, we have heard that contrary to popular belief, Christmas holidays are actually a promising time to secure a new position. Do you agree?

That’s a great question and yes, it is a myth that holidays or quieter times of business aren't a good time to be looking for work. Consider that most job seekers mistakenly assume that activity slows down in companies and therefore decrease their search efforts. By virtue of that thinking, this creates less competition and easier entry into speaking with potential employers. At the moment, the job market is pretty hot as I spoke with several HR recruiters from the oil & gas industry last week who have not seen any decrease in their workload. Also, while people may not secure a position right away at this time, it’s still a good idea to have informational interviews and gather market information on various industries as people generally tend to be in a much more receptive frame of mind around the holidays.

Is it quantity over quality during big parties? Should the goal be to connect with as many people as possible?

I would always choose quality over quantity. There is a tendency towards thinking that the higher the number the better the odds. However, from a strategic point of view, it is important to consider the best use of time and resources. Are you better off handing out your business card to 50 people whom you may not remember, or speaking with 5 or 6 people with whom you made a strong connection and then continuing to build those relationships? People will also find that by investing time in cultivating those relationships, the numbers will come—that’s the power of networking combined with strong relationship building skills.

What about party etiquette when someone is networking? For example, is it wise to stay clear of the rum and eggnog?

It’s important to remember that in these types of events you are always “on.” Be aware of what type of image and impression you are conveying to the public. It is not to say that you shouldn’t be yourself but depending on the context of your situation, it might be wise not to over imbibe as you want to be able to put your best self forward and not an altered version of yourself. There are many an office party story that has resulted in unfortunate outcomes for both staff and managers alike—you want to steer clear of becoming one of those characters.

Do you have any other networking advice over the holiday season?

While it is important to continue your efforts over the holidays, don’t forget to take time out for yourself. Ensure that you have sufficient time to attend to yourself and those around you as well as continuing with your job search. Look for different opportunities and events that are connected to what you are looking for. In addition, volunteer opportunities, community events, spousal parties and events within your network may also hold possibilities so be open to all opportunities. Most importantly—stay positive. This is the season to reflect on what we are grateful for and look forward to greater possibilities.

Lisa Dare is a management consultant, leadership & executive coach, and facilitator. She is also the incoming president of the Calgary Association of Professional Coaches and a volunteer with the Central Library’s Strategic Networking program that runs every Thursday evening at the Central Library. She can be reached at ld_assoc@telus.net

Lost Your Interviewing Mojo?

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Recently, I talked with a discouraged, unemployed job searcher. She had a wonderful skill set, years of experience, and a sharp resume that was landing her interviews. But things had ground to a halt. What was happening in the interview? Was she too nervous or fidgety? Was she coming across as too desperate? Was she failing to make a connection with the interviewer, or did she need to be more prepared?

Library resources can often help. Interview books are one of the most popular parts of the Calgary Public Library's career collection. Along with sample questions, research strategies, advice on what to wear, and the psychology of the interview process, they offer valuable and often surprising advice. Sometimes, however, mock interviews offer the best opportunities to fine tune the art of the interview.

Alberta Human Services offers a highly regarded, two day workshop Interview Skills Workshop in Calgary, at no cost to job seekers and run by qualified career practitioners. As well as stressing the importance of being properly prepared for an interview, these workshops:

  • review current interviewing theory and selection practices
  • develop increased confidence and comfort with the interview process
  • offer an opportunity to practice interview skills and strategies

 

The Public Library's Career Coaching program also features volunteers that can offer up to 30 minutes of advice and mock interview questions, if the two day course doesn't work for you. As well, Bow Valley College Career Connection hosts in house and library interview workshops on a regular basis.

Job Loss or Job Transition?

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So many people in Calgary are in job-hunting mode, either because they've lost a job or because they want a different one. The Job Loss or Job Transition? program is designed to give you the tips you need to deal with loss and move forward in your professional life.

Job Loss or Job Transition?

An interactive workshop intended for those who:

    • Have recently lost their job
    • Are looking for a new job
    • Want to learn how to navigate a volatile job market

This workshop will provide practical tips on:

    • How to recover from job loss
    • Building a job loss action plan
    • How to evaluate new opportunities and job offers
    • Maintaining employment once you have it

 

Saturday, November 24, 2012
11:00 am to 1:00 pm
Central Library, Third Floor (register online or by phone)

 


Presenter Paul Chisholm has worked in Human Resources and staffing for over ten years. Upon completing a Bachelor’s Degree and Diploma in Human Resource Management, Paul began his career as a technical recruiter. Servicing the manufacturing, Oil & Gas and engineering sectors Paul has recruited everything from new graduates to technical specialists to executive managers.

On leaving the staffing business Paul moved into Corporate Human Resources as an in-house recruiter. Dealing with line managers and company executives on a daily basis has provided Paul with an excellent insight into recruitment decisions. Over the years, he's had countless interviews with all levels of candidates, has provided training on interview skills, job search and resume writing. His approach is to provide practical real world advice to those seeking to maximize their job search potential.

WORKshift

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On Friday, November 16th at 11:45, the Central Library is pleased to host Dr. Laura Hambley as she presents on The Psychology of WORKshift, in conjunction with the Career Development Association of Alberta. Learn how employees can have the flexibility to work when and where they are most efficient, and how this relates to career planning . We interviewed Dr. Hambley to get a primer on WORKshift and where it is headed:

Dr. Hambley, I understand the term telecommuting is no longer in vogue, nor best describes this push towards flexible work environments (WORKshift). Is this trend gathering steam in Calgary?

Yes, WORKshift is definitely gaining momentum. I’ve seen interest in and adoption of WORKshift reaching a tipping point in Calgary this past year, having grown significantly since I first began my research in this area in 2004. And not just large organizations are adopting WORKshift, but also small and mid-sized, and both private and public. Not everyone uses the term WORKshift, and we use it synonymously with telework. Organizations sometimes coin their own terms for WORKshift arrangements.

Companies such as TELUS, the City of Calgary, ATB Financial have all embraced this work environment for employees. Do you have a sense of why other companies are more reluctant?

Managerial mindset is one of the biggest barriers we see. Basically, managers believing that their people must be seen to be working. This is known as “presenteeism”, and in actuality a person sitting at a desk does not guarantee they are being as productive as possible!

Do you think companies are worried their employees will be less productive if they are not in the office?

Absolutely. They do not trust people to manage their time and distractions, and to prioritize work appropriately. But this lack of trust is a major issue, as whether one’s team is in or out of the office, trust needs to be there for effective working relationships to happen.

Is WORKshift more popular with women than men? If so, why?

I have not seen differences in numbers of men or women who WORKshift. We do see greater adoption with the younger generations as a trend, which makes sense given increased comfort with technology. We also see certain departments or industries being earlier embracers than others. Not surprisingly, the IT departments tend to pave the way.

Is the prevalence of portable technology making this more feasible?

Absolutely! This article was published recently – it shows what may be coming in the future with the current levels of technological progress. As well, this website also has great information for those wanting to learn more about WORKshift.

Laura has a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology specializing in the human dynamics of virtual leadership/teamwork and WORKshift. She has completed and published extensive research on the critical success factors for effectively leading virtual teams and WORKshifters, has co-authored a book on the topic (Growing the Virtual Workplace, 2008) and her research has also been published and presented at international conferences Laura is an entrepreneur who has helped create The Leadership Store, a Calgary-based leadership consulting firm and founded Calgary Career Counselling. She is also an Adjunct Professor with the Department of Psychology at the University of Calgary.

Beyond Golf

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This week I had the happy pleasure of taking part in a Job Search Boot Camp, sponsored by Alberta Human Services, where I reconnected with local career expert Nell Smith. Poised to start work on a new retirement book for Boomers, she shared the following article she wrote and had been presenting in her workshops. Along with the points below, Nell recommends the books 10 Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me About and You Could Live a Long Time: Are You Ready? for those of you thinking beyond traditional retirement, both available at Calgary Public Library.

There’s more to retirement than golf and travel, the two most common interests of past retirees. Today, boomers and pre-boomers are re-inventing a retirement in which anything is possible. Here, whittled down from over seven decades of life experience, research, and the experiences of family, friends and all those wonderful people who have participated in my career and retirement planning workshops, are my ten best tips for retiring to a life you design, one that is fulfilling and unique to you.

  1. Phase your retirement. Instead of going abruptly from full-time work to full-time leisure, continue to work part-time, do contract, temporary, or casual work. Start a new career, start your own business, or take on a project that interests you.
  2. Know yourself, what is important and what you love. Stay true to who you are. Retire from the inside, out.
  3. Join a group-which is the easiest way to stay socially connected. Fear of social isolation is a common concern for retirees. Could a service or book club be in your future?
  4. Nurture the family relationships and friendships you want to keep; rekindle friendships that have lapsed; let go of friendships that are not in your best interest.
  5. Continue to learn something – a new skill or new knowledge. Learning keeps you mentally alert, interested in the present and future, and interesting to others. Have you always wanted to play the guitar? If not now, then when? Give it a try.
  6. Keep physically active. Go for a daily walk even without a dog. Cycle, swim, run, ski, try line dancing, or walk to your neighbourhood coffee shop.
  7. Volunteer for a cause you believe in, formally or informally, locally or globally. Contribute your skills and wisdom for the greater good of your family, community, or society. Broaden your thinking from “me” to “we” and you will create new meaning and purpose in your life.
  8. Adopt an attitude of gratefulness and compassion towards others. Seek opportunities to express these daily to those whose paths you cross.
  9. Be creative. Yes you can. We are all creative in our own way. Explore in what new ways you want to express your creativity: could it be art, music, inventing, quilting, scrap-booking, gardening, photography, writing, designing, crafting, woodworking, decorating. The possibilities are endless. Explore - give it a try. There’s nothing to lose and who knows what you’ll gain?
  10. Feed your soul: meditate, pray, journal, read spiritual books, be in nature, do yoga, tai chi, listen to music…all great ways to de-stress and just BE. Follow the advice on a bench in Fish Creek Provincial Park that says:

Take the time to sit and ponder; let your mind and spirit wander. Enjoy the view; embrace the day; remember to take the time to play.

 

Nell Smith is a professional retirement planner, career consultant, adult educator, and author who created the Retire to the Life You Design© program that currently operates in four Canadian provinces. Nell is writing a book for boomers on how to re-engage, re-energize, and re-invent their retirement from the inside out.

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