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Aviation History

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 1122


The Airport, Calgary, Alberta Canada

Postcards from the Past, PC 1122

We had a wonderful Heritage Weekend despite the snowy weather and the inevitable fear of failure (mostly of the technology) it all went off without a hitch. And, boy did we have some speakers! We heard about the Barron building, the Century Homes project, the plans for Calgary that never happened, stories of interesting people and events from Calgary’s past, information about the heritage in our midst and about the great Calgary aviator, Freddie McCall. Pages Books was there selling the works of many of our speakers (thanks Richard) and the meet and greet included lots of people from many organizations, all chatting about heritage in this city. It was a real buzz! I don’t know how we will top it next year, but we’ll try!

I am almost, but not quite,” heritaged” out so I was madly casting about for a blog idea. As usual, the newspapers provided my topic. As I was doing some BMD transcription for the Alberta Family Histories Society (a great project, if any of you are interested in it) I found an article that fit quite nicely in with the subject of our Friday night speaker. On September 17, 1919 a flight was made by two airmen, Lieuts. Lobb and Rowe, from Saskatoon to Winnipeg, and it only took 5 hours! They had to make 3 stops for gasoline.

They announced that they would try a non-stop flight the next week so I went searching for the newspaper report of their success. I found a small article on page seven of the September 23 edition of the Calgary Daily Herald. It seems that, sadly, the weather did not cooperate and they had heavy rainfall for 2 hours and a strong head wind. They had to make three stops, again, but this time it took them 14 hours to complete the flight. The plane belonged to the Keng Wah aviation school and was “driven” by Lieut. Harry Lobb. The Keng Wah school was an interesting one. Set up by Stan McClelland, a lieutenant in the Royal Air Force, it was developed to train young Chinese men from the China, the US and Canada to fly for Sun-Yat Sen’s airforce. It's base was just outside of Saskatoon.

At the same time this was happening, Fred McCall was flying at fairs around Alberta. He was overwhelmed by the response from the people he met and was taking many of them on their first "flip". This was pretty brave of them considering that only two months earlier, McCall had "landed" his plane on top of a carousel at the Exhibition Grounds in Calgary. The history of aviation is a strange and interesting study, is it not?

You can find the story of the aviation school in Aviation in Canada: the Formative Years by Larry Milberry This title can be signed out. You can also sign out the biography of Fred McCall by Shirlee Smith Matheson, Maverick in the sky An interesting item you might want to have a look it is a 1919 publication called Aviation in Canada by Alan Sullivan. This book is in the Local History collection, so doesn’t go out, but it can be consulted at any time.

Article CDH Sep 18 1919

Headline of article on Fred McCall's efforts to establish a passenger flight service

Calgary Daily Herald, September 18, 1919, p. 8

From Our Future Our Past

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