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We're on Youtube

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

 

YouTube

We may be over 100 years old, but we’re not antiques yet. We have a new collection of Local History materials, not in a physical format, per se, but a wonderful collection all the same. On Calgary Public Library’s YouTube channel (yes, we do have a YouTube channel) we have uploaded a number of local history talks by some of our favourite local historians. We have just uploaded the series “Calgary Stories” recorded during our Heritage Weekend and featuring Harry Sanders, John Gilpin and David Finch each talking about a different aspect of Calgary’s history.

We have also uploaded our instructional program Research the History of Your House presented as part of the Century Homes project by members of Calgary Public Library’s Community Heritage and Family History department, an archivist from the City of Calgary, Corporate Records, Archives and a librarian from the Glenbow Museum, Library and Archives. It is a great resource for anyone interested in researching buildings or the people who lived in them. Check it out.

We are very excited to be able to have these available for our customers and anyone else who is interested in the history of the city. But the YouTube collection is not just about history, there are other videos available as well, including the wonderful talk given by Lawrence Hill for the launch of One Book One Calgary and talks by other authors who have visited Calgary Public Library. If you missed Jo Nesbo or Guy Gavriel Kay you can check out their presentations as well. We are constantly adding recordings, so visit early and visit often!

Pets in Your Family Tree

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

Dad and Peggy the dog

My Dad and his dog Peggy, 1931

Some people love their pets to the point of distraction. I may fall into that category (well, not quite) but I was tickled by some of the recent information I’ve found in my genealogical travels. What triggered this (no pun intended) was a search in findmypast.ie (this is a private, fee-based). I turned up tons of Sheridans and on further examination found that they were listed because they had licensed their dogs. Yes, dog license registrations for parts of Ireland are on Find My Past!

One might wonder what could possibly be gained by knowing that great uncle James owned several sheep dogs and a mastiff. Well, the first thing we would know is that great uncle James was a sheep farmer (granted, not a huge leap of imagination given that the man lived in Donegal, but still.) However, we have found the place where great uncle James lived and in Ireland, where any record is a good record, that is a very important piece of information.

Once I’d found these registers, I had to explore further. Most of the licenses are for working dogs like sheep dogs and terriers, some are for racing dogs—which is what I was hoping to find for the Sheridans who raised great racing dogs—but some are a little harder to fathom, like Mr. Coll in Rathmullen who owned two black poodles. Yes I know poodles are actually a sporting dog, but in a sea of terriers and sheepdogs, the poodles do say something about the man, don’t you think?

Another indication of the importance of pets in our lives is their inclusion in the census records. I was reading one of the many blogs that I regularly peruse and came across the story of Bobs, the black cat, who was enumerated in the 1911 British Census. It appears that in Britain, the householder filled out the census form, unlike in Canada, where people were enumerated and their names put on a list. I had to pursue this further and came across another posting, this time for a dog that listed not only her name but that she was a “faithful Irish terrier”—hence the name Biddy, the fact that she was a “demon on cats and vermin” and that she was 11 years old.

Again, this says as much about the person who owned her as it does about Biddy and it reminded me of visiting my husband’s aunt who kept a small Parson’s terrier on her farm in Cavan. He was a charmer and my husband mentioned this fact to his aunt who said “Aye, and he’s a great ratter” driving home the vast difference between her rural life and our, more sheltered, urban one.

So, scoff as you may about the keeping of seemingly useless records—there is no such thing in genealogical research.

Building Curiosity

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

 

James McMenamin

'Building Curiosity'

The Calgary Education Centre

by James McMenamin

The preservation of our built heritage involves many people and many partnerships. We are very lucky, here at the Calgary Public Library, to have many good friends and partners in our work to collect and make available material that furthers the cause of heritage preservation in the city.

One of our partners to this end is the Calgary Heritage Authority. We are proud to join with them in launching a new collection of photographs intended to create a visual record of the buildings and landscapes included in the City of Calgary’s Inventory of Evaluated Historic Sites.

 

Photo by James McMenamin

Eamon's Camp by James McMenamin

City of Calgary Heritage Inventory Collection, ECP JM 018

These photographs are an important part of the historic resource documentation process. They will be readily available to all interested researchers and will give them access to detailed building information that might otherwise be lost, particularly if the building has been demolished. The initial collection is by photographers James McMenamin and Michael Knudsen. It offers a detailed look at three important buildings in Calgary’s history: The Harvey Block, The Barron Building and Eamon’s Bungalow Camp.

 

Harvey Block

Harvey Block by Michael Knudsen

City of Calgary Heritage Inventory Collection

 

James McMenamin is also exhibiting at the Kasian Gallery at the University of Calgary. The exhibition ‘Building Curiousity’ is a visual record of a very unique space, the brutalist Calgary Education Centre. It includes interior and exterior views and the ideas generated by MoDA Architecture, Nyhoff Architecture and SPECTACLE for the reuse of the building. The research work of Lindsay Horan, Leanne Junnila and Phil Wilson will also be displayed.

'Building Curiosity' also features photographs of other spaces that were ripe for reinvigoration. A public reception will be held on Friday November 22 from 6:00 to 7:30 PM at the Kasian Gallery, which is located in the Faculty of Environmental Design, room 2145 of the Professional Faculties Building on the University of Calgary campus.

Lest We Forget

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

 

PC 1478

I.O.D.E. War Memorial in front of Memorial Park Library, ca 1920s

Postcards from the Past, PC 1478

 

Next Monday is Remembrance Day. It is the time of the year when we pay homage to those men and women who served our country. A great way to honour our military ancestors is to tell their story. I’ve pulled together a few sources to help you access information about Canada’s military.

I was recently made aware of couple of new databases that include information about our military ancestors. Last night the Jewish Historical Society of Southern Alberta launched its new database, Southern Alberta Jewish Veterans of World War I & II. The database aims to include those Jewish veterans of the two World Wars who spent a part of their lives in Southern Alberta.

The second database is of veterans of a much earlier war. The War of 1812 Veteran Graveside Project will provide a database of biographical information on thousands of veterans of the War of 1812. There is currently no national recognition for these veterans and many Canadians are unaware of the importance of this war to the founding of our country. The research for this database is done by historians, students and other interested parties. If you have an ancestor for whom you would like a graveside marker you can apply through the site.

There is a wealth of information for researching your military ancestor in Canada. AncestryLE (accessible at your Calgary Public Library branch) has a great selection of Canadian military records including selected records of soldiers who died in WWII, militia lists, lists of prisoners held by the Royal Navy in Canada at the beginning of the 19th century, and Canadian War Graves Registers, just to name a few.

 

PC 1590

Four Soldiers in Uniform in Calgary, ca 1915

Postcards from the Past, PC 1590

There is also very good access to military records through the Canadian Genealogy Centre. Records there date back to the French Regime and include links to war diaries and loyalist information. There are also service records from WWI and for those killed in action in World War II, as well as records from the rebellions and the Boer War.

Included in this treasure trove of military records is information about the Black Loyalists. This provides a great segue to our One Book One Calgary launch this Friday, November 8 where we will kick off the event with author Lawrence Hill and The Book of Negroes. Among the information provided under “Loyalists” in the military records at Library and Archives Canada is a link to the actual Book of Negroes which gave the novel its title. This list contains the names and information about many Black Loyalists and is a great resource for anyone researching their ancestors or anyone who is interested in the hidden history of the Black pioneers. Keep an eye on our website or check our program guide to find out about the great programs we have lined up to celebrate One Book One Calgary.

15th Light Horse Band

Postcards from the Past, PC 1264

PC 1264