Latest Posts

Off Line

The Heritage Triangle PDF link

Viva the Village

by Christine H - 1 Comment(s)

PC 1690

Looking East from the Grain Exchange Building, 1911

Postcards from the Past, PC 1690

I’ve just had a look at the animation of the master plan for the East Village. You can see it on the CMLC website. It’s a very exciting vision and the I'm excited that the library is going to continue to be an important part of the life down here.

In a way, this is a rebirth for the East Village. It’s hard to believe, looking at it now with its unending vistas of parking lots, but the east end of the city was once the centre of this bustling metropolis. I was reminded of this once more, by a question from a customer about what was on the site of the current Central Library before it was built. And as luck would have it, while I was looking into this question I ran into one of my favourite local historians who was able to tell me alot about what was on the site before the library was built, including a gas station and Nagler's Department Story. I don’t know how I missed this important detail, but it got me thinking about the new library site and what was on it before its redevelopment (read “parking lot-ization”).

I consulted some of my favourite resources, in addition to my local historian, including the fire insurance plans for Calgary (available on the Library and Archives Canada site) and the Henderson's directories (available in the local history room at the Central Library and online at Peel's Prairie Provinces)

The strip along 9th Avenue SE was home to many of our early hotels, of which only the King Edward (until recently) survived. The Imperial, Grand Union, and Oxford, along with the Maple Leaf Boarding House, lined the street, a natural outgrowth of the proximity of the train station. Serving these hotels were livery stables and there were two still active on 9th Avenue E. in 1911, the Atlantic and Brandon and Young. There were two livery stables on or near the site of the present Central Library as well, Elk Livery and Palace Livery. The New Central Library site is just to the west of the Oxford Hotel and Atlantic Livery, sitting on the back part of the Calgary Iron Works site and blacksmith John R. Grayshon’s shop.

On what would have been the Eighth Avenue side of the site (back when Eighth Avenue was continuous) there were several shops, including Chicago Outfitting and McLeod and Co. There were also several grocers, the Sunnyland Café, the Excelsior Block, a furniture store and McLeod’s Men’s Furnishings. The Seventh Avenue end of the site was residential, with homeowners Mrs. Peter Ronn, saddler Frank Carson and plumber Maxime Longuet all living there. On the same street, though not on the site of the New Central Library, there was a cigar factory and a Moravian Church.

The East end of the city was a bustling and vibrant place back in 1911. The plans for its revitalization are exciting and promise to bring back the vitality and vigor that was present before we paved it.

You can find out more information about the New Central Library by following the link on our website

AJ 1294

Moravian Church, 7th Avenue and 3rd Street East, ca 1964

Alison Jackson Photograph Collection, AJ 1294

Upcoming Genealogy Events

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

 

Dave Obee is coming to town! The Alberta Family Histories Society is bringing Dave Obee to Calgary for a day-long event covering many aspects of Canadian genealogical research. He will be talking about using the internet for research, finding information on our immigrant ancestors, how to squeeze the last drop of information from the census and Canadians in World War I. Dave Obee is a very big name in Canadian genealogy circles and has written a number of books that I use nearly every day. This is going to be a great seminar and it is dirt cheap - $35 if you register before March 1, $45 if you register after. Check out information on the Alberta Family Histories Society website. I am so looking forward to this – I hope to see you there.

Closer to home, we will be offering our Genealogy for Beginners program at the Fish Creek Library on February 22 at 7 PM. This is the perfect opportunity to find out how to start that family history project. For more information and to register click here.

Also remember our Family History Coaching sessions on the last Saturday of the month from 10 to noon until June 28. We meet on the 4th floor of the Central Library and we can help you one-on-one with your genealogical research. This is a drop in program, so no registration is required.

In the genealogy vein, but not exactly a genealogy program, is the lecture series being put on at the Military Museums to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War. A series of lectures will be run over the next three months including Dr. John Ferris, talking about the outbreak of World War I, Rob Alexander sharing his grandfather’s account of the Dieppe Raid and the invasion of Italy from his diaries, and Lindsey Sharman introducing Forging a Nation: Canada Goes to War, the newest exhibit in the Founder’s Gallery at the Museum. For more information visit their website.

Sarcee Camp

192nd Battalion, Sarcee Camp Calgary, 1916

Postcards from the Past, PC 965

If you are a teacher looking for an interesting way to engage your high-school students in the life of a World War I soldier, contact me about presenting our Lest We Forget program. We bring the service records of local soldiers and each student can use these documents to create a story or a tribute to the soldier. This has been a very successful program, leading students to a deeper understanding of the meaning and impact of war in the lives of our ancestors. If you’re interested, contact me.

Tonight is the Heritage Trades Roundtable at Rideau Park School. We will be listening to presentations about Beautiful Brick. For more information and to register visit their site.

 

If you have an upcoming genealogy event you would like us to mention, please feel free to post a comment below.

The Amazon, Again

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 1591

Five People in a Rowboat at Bowness Park

Postcards from the Past, PC 1591

When I wrote about the Amazon statue back in December of last year, we felt we were hot on the trail of finding out what had happened to the statue. We were inspired by the article that Daniel Lindley had written for Stephen, the magazine put out by the Epcor Centre, to comb the City’s annual reports and the reports of the Parks Department to see if we could find any trace of what had happened to her. The statue was moved, as previously mentioned, to the South Mount Royal Park in 1934 but it disappeared some time before 1953. And the reason I know that is that Daniel was contacted by someone who lived in the area and who showed him pictures of the statue and also a picture of her dog on the vacant plinth in 1953. You can read the update in the latest issue of Stephen. So, we’re a little closer to narrowing down a date, but I can find no mention of the fate of the Amazon in any of the reports.

I did find some other interesting stuff, though. The Parks Department reports are fascinating reading. Most include lists of animals at the zoo, locations and sizes of the various parks, what was planted in the parks and on the boulevards, what it cost to do various tasks. I found two separate charges for the moving of the museum specimens from Coste house; one in 1941 “Moving museum to car barns” at $3.23 and again in 1943 : “Coste’s residence, moving museum specimens” at $73.22. This would have been the collection that included our buffalo (see my previous post.)

Something else I found is that there was a street car placed in Roxboro Park to serve as a shelter. In the 1940 report, Mr. Reader, the superintendent stated: “ The old street car that was placed on this park and converted into a shelter is abused to such an extent that it seems practically useless to make any more repairs. “ I think it was dismantled in 1942. I can’t find any other record of it, but I will certainly keep looking. Wink

PC 1138

Calgary Tigers Playing Football in Hillhurst Park

Postcards from the Past, PC 1138

Beautiful Brick: The Heritage Trades Roundtable

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

ch 2012 008

Parkdale house, developed by Alfred McKay and built with Crandell Pressed Brick

Century Homes Photographs, CH 2012-008

The second Heritage Trades Round Table is set to go on January 28. This one is particularly apropos given the decision recently taken by the CBE to demolish the lovely old Elbow Park School, as it is on the subject of beautiful brick.

Calgary has long been known as the "Sandstone City" due to the number of nearby sandstone quarries. Many people are unaware, however, that we had a good number of brickworks in the vicinity as well. The area around Cochrane had the silty hard clay that was great for making bricks and much of the production of the three brickyards operating there in the early 20th century was shipped to Calgary. Calgary had its own brickyards as well; the earliest of these being Peel’s brickyard which opened in 1886 in the area of what is now Roxboro. “Gravity” Watson’s yard was established in 1893 near the Edworthy Ranch in the Shaganappi area. This became known as Brickburn. The company was later sold to Edward Crandell, whose beautiful brick home still stands in Patterson Heights and is perhaps better known as the house where Stu Hart lived and trained his wrestlers.

Another entrepreneur who got into the brick business and whose imposing home still stands was William Nimmons. He started a small brickyard on the site of his quarry in the Bankview area. The quarry at Glenbow also had brickworks on the site. There were also small brickworks, run by home builders who provided bricks for their own construction. William Kempling was one such. His operation was located between Centre St. and 4 St. E.

If you are a brick aficionado and would like to learn more about the history of brick production and construction in Calgary, you need to come to the next Heritage Roundtable. You will meet some of the people who make the preservation and maintenance of the buildings and features we love possible. The evening will include:

•Historic brick production & industry in Alberta — Malcolm Sissons, president, I-XL Industries Ltd., a 4th generation family business founded in 1912 as the Redcliff Pressed Brick Co.

•Current brick masonry trade, traditional methods — Neil Puype, principal of a heritage building consulting company and 5th generation brick and stone mason

•Early brickyards & building with brick in Calgary — Marilyn Williams, Heritage Roundtables steering committee

This is going to be great, talking ‘bout brick in the Sandstone City, so join us. The event takes place Rideau Park School gymnasium, 829 Rideau Road SW and starts at 7:00 pm (doors will open at 6:30 pm). It is open to the public and free of charge. To register, click here.

 

AJ 88 05

Mewata Armouries, entrance to the Drill Hall, ca 1965

Alison Jackson Photograph Collection, AJ 88-05

The Value of Old Buildings

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

Elbow Park School

Elbow Park School

From the Elbow Park School Website

Elbow Park School is in the news again. The CBE is meeting to discuss what will be done with the school – should it be torn down and replaced or restored? Schools often present challenges for the people who want to save old buildings. They are large and occupy vast tracts of land, often in very desirable neighbourhoods. The people who hold Elbow Park’s fate in their hands are facing a real dilemma. Yes, a new school would have all the bells and whistles, enough plug ins for all the electronics (I work in an older building myself and understand this challenge especially), a better gym, and all the amenities that new buildings offer, but they will also lose a character building, in a sense they will lose the history of their school. The neighbourhood, which is one of the oldest in the city, will lose more of its defining characteristics, the characteristics that make it such a wonderful place to live.

So what, you might say. This is a pointless discussion. An old building is an old building and the best way to deal with it is to replace it. That it is flood damaged is the perfect opportunity to look to the future and build something “better.” This is at the heart of much of what we do in the heritage community. What is the value of an old building? Is there more than monetary value to consider when we decide their fate? Is newer necessarily better?

There are lots of arguments to support both points of view. Reusing old buildings adds character to cities – remember when Mordecai Richler famously stated that Calgary would be a helluva city once it was uncrated? We’ve come a long way from there. We value our heritage and realize that preserving our old buildings gives a sense of the history to a city, something that we lose every time we knock one of them down. Old school buildings are especially important in the history of place. “Schools were once thought of as important civic landmarks built to last a century. They represented community investments that inspired civic pride and participation in public life," said Richard Moe, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. There is an excellent study on the fate of historic neighbourhood schools by the Trust called “Why Johnny Can’t Walk to School: Historic Neighborhood Schools in the Age of Sprawl.”

There is also the practical value of restoration. It is a far greener option than dumping demolition rubble into a landfill. Restoration allows for the removal of any nasty stuff like asbestos and allows for a general buff-up. If Jane Jacobs is correct that new ideas require old buildings, sending our kids to school in a historic building could open the way for who knows what kind of engagement. If you don’t want your kids to go to school in an old building, then perhaps we should reconsider the value of Ivy League schools, or Oxford or Cambridge. Part of what makes the experience there so valuable is the history behind them, represented, not in the least, by their wonderful historic buildings.

I hope we get to keep that beautiful school. It would be a shame to lose another one.

PC 1998

St. Mary's School

Postcards from the Past, PC 1998

Out With the Old?

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

 CPL 103-26-01

Museum at Calgary Public Library, 1912

Calgary Public Library Archives, CPL 103-26-01

This year I thought I would resolve to follow my nose, just like Toucan Sam, and research the things that really caught my eye, no matter how bizarre. Appropriately, as I was reading Harry the Historian’s Twitter feed I saw an article he had posted dating from December 29, 1913 that announced that buffalo meat was available for the first time in many years, from P. Burns and Co. The meat had come from two buffalo culled from the government ranch herd at Wainwright. Even one hundred years ago the buffalo was a novelty on the prairies and animals were protected at the Wainwright ranch. These particular animals were on their way to be mounted and placed in the Calgary Public Library. Hmmm. Weird thing to have at the library, don’t you think? So, to follow through on my resolution, I am going to find out what became of these beasts and why they were headed to the library.

When the Calgary Public Library first opened its doors in 1912, it had extra space that was not being used — probably the first and last time that ever happened at a library — so when Dr. Euston Sisley and the Calgary Natural History Society looked to establish a museum, it was housed on the second floor of the new library. We have a picture of it in our archives (see above). There are no buffalo evident in that photo, but I am guessing that the beasties were actually headed to the museum, not the library. By 1914 the Library needed more space (surprise) so the museum collection was moved to the basement of the courthouse.

 

PC 1259

Courthouse, ca 1906

Postcards from the Past, PC 1259

The collection continued to grow, especially after the museum was given to the City of Calgary. It became the Calgary Public Museum in 1928 and the collections were moved to the North West Travellers building. Long before the Tyrell museum, our own municipal museum housed one of the few specimens of duck billed dinosaurs in the world. The collection grew and became quite impressive. A 1932 article from the Herald lists some of the finest collections including trilobites, an outstanding coin and medal collection and Oliver Cromwell’s spectacles. A slightly later article (December 15, 1934) includes a photo of the natural exhibits including deer and a very large moose. There is a buffalo hiding at the back. By all accounts this was an excellent museum, somewhat lacking in focus, perhaps, but its collection of 8,000 items was a credit to the city. So what happened? Well, the depression happened. As was the case with many of the jewels in this city’s crown, the financial strain became too much and the museum closed its doors in 1935.

From there the story of Calgary’s museum and its specimens, including the buffalo, takes a sorry turn. The collections were put in the basement of the Coste House, which was another victim of the depression. The city had taken ownership of the house due to unpaid taxes. The collections were stowed there with no measures taken to ensure their safety or condition. Over the years some of the items were moved, including one of the buffalo, which was given to the Stampede and used outside the NWMP hut during Stampede week. The other two, likely the ones mentioned in Harry’s clipping, were stored in the street railway barns and finally burned in 1946. Sigh.

Albertan article

"Into the Incinterator"

The Albertan, October 2, 1946

Sorry for the downer New Year’s post but here’s to a happy and heritage 2014. It will only get better!

What did you get from Santa?

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 868

Parade along 8th Avenue (handwriting indicating "Papa's store" with arrow pointing to Linton Bros.), 1908

Postcards from the Past, PC 868

I no longer have little ones to buy presents for at Christmas, which is a shame because I love toys. I reminisce about my Mrs. Beasley doll and my Easy-Bake oven, or the little French telephone set and my Kenner Knit-O-Matic, all of which I see now advertised as vintage antiques. Sigh.

I know that this year kids will be asking for all kinds of electronics (although I’m heartened to see that one of the hottest toys this year is the Kendama, which doesn’t require batteries, a plug-in or any high-tech savvy.) And, as is my wont, I get to wondering about the history of it all. What kinds of things did kids in Calgary a hundred years ago get from Santa? I went rooting through my resources in the Local History room and found a wonderful resource at the Calgary Public Library for just this kind of browsing: the Eaton’s Catalogues on microfilm (which I am told is kind of an antique in itself). When I was a kid I got all of the items on my Santa list from the Eaton’s wish book. And it appears it was always thus.

Long before there was the internet, there was mail-order. The catalogues would arrive by mail, you would send your orders by mail (or later, you could order by telephone) and your stuff would be sent by mail. That could take some time, but you could also get things that weren’t easily available in your local community. That was especially important in remote areas, which was most of Western Canada back in the late 19th century. In fact, according to Collections Canada, the Eaton’s catalogue was sometimes called the Prairie Bible. You can access a great digitized collection of mail order catalogues at the Collections Canada site.

Train set

A page from the toy section of the 1913 Fall/Winter Eaton's Catalogue

So what did kids get for Christmas? There were some really cool things on offer. In the 1915 winter catalogue there were toy grocery store items, a submarine game, a big-game hunter set with a target bear, dollies, tea sets, cowboy outfits, a clothes washing set, complete with washboard and wringer and even a Ouija board!

What about earlier, though. Kids in 1897 might wish for a tricycle or a toy wheelbarrow. In 1886 the list of toys in the Eaton’s catalogue include dolls and accessories for them, dominoes and other games, a whistling steam engine, magic lanterns, musical instruments and riding, driving and dog whips (really!). Skates seem to have been a very popular item. There were sleighs and wagons and rocking horses to be had closer to home, however, as Linton’s had a Toyland on the second floor. Treats such as oranges, candy, figs, nuts and raisins, were also brought in by retailers for the season.

Whatever the gifts, Christmas has always been a time for family. Have a wonderful time with yours.

How To Set a Christmas Table

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 814

Christmas wished from Calgary Milling Co. Limited. 191?

Postcards from the Past, PC 814

(Flour companies often published cookbooks)

I love my old cookbooks. Not that I cook that much, but having a collection of cookbooks from my family members is like having those family members with me. I still use my mom’s Purity cookbook to make the foods I remember from my childhood like banana bread and dream squares (and a horrible concoction of caramel syrup and dough gobs that my sister christened “death balls”). I look upon cookbooks as historical documents that not only tell us what our ancestors were eating, but how they conducted their lives. I mean, do we still have Bridge Teas? Doesn’t the very fact of a bridge tea speak to a different way of life?

The Local History room at the Central Library has an interesting collection of cookbooks, all with a relevance to the history of Calgary. It was in the Royal Purple Lodge No. 7 cookbook that I found the suggested menu for a Bridge Tea, complete with ribbon sandwiches and American Beauty salad. What really caught my eye, though, was the suggested menu for Christmas dinner in the Blue Bird Cook Book by the Domestic Science Department of the American Women’s Club of Calgary. The Christmas menu contains nothing, besides the turkey, that I recognize (or would eat, really). The starter is Oyster Cocktails and Salted Wafers. The soup course is consommé with toasted bread rings (made with day old bread and a doughnut cutter). The turkey was stuffed with a mixture of milk and cracker crumbs and served with cranberry mold, potato baskets and Christmas salad (grapefruit and orange sections laid out in a wreath shape with red pepper and garnished with a pickled cherry). Dessert was a choice of pineapple sherbet or Christmas cake, with a holly garnish made from candied peel and cinnamon candies. Yummy.

This would all be served on a table laid out as below. Note that this was for a family dinner, without the service of a maid. One hopes the maid would be given the day off to be with her family. This suggested setting comes from the Blue Ribbon Cook Book, 17th edition. The book also gives advice about serving protocol and admonishes against the use of intoxicating liquors. (The recipes in the book substitute fruit juice for booze and, in the case of brandy for the fruit cake, two tablespoons of molasses are said to be an excellent substitute).

 

How to set a table

How to set a table, from the Blue Ribbon Cook Book, ca 1930s?

Whatever Happened to the Amazon Statue?

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

Mounted Amazon Attacked by a Panther

Mounted Amazon Attacked by a Panther, by August Kiss

Altes Museum, Berlin

Here at the library, we are sometimes asked questions for which we can’t find answers. Generally we are happy that we have given it our best shot, exhausted all of our resources and, usually, referred the customer on to someone who may be able to find more information. Because we are the kinds of people who work in libraries (read: nerds) sometimes we can’t let a question go and we continue to keep our eye out for anything relating to this elusive quest. One such question that has plagued me since I started here back in the cardaceous period (when card catalogs roamed the earth) is the question of what happened to the Amazon statue that once stood in front of the Memorial Park Library. We have been asked about this statue innumerable times and we were especially driven to find an answer when Brian Brennan was writing our official centennial history. We still have no definitive answer, but we feel we may be close.

There was an excellent article written about the Amazon sculpture by Daniel Lindley for the May issue of the magazine Stephen (page 28), which is put out by the Epcor Centre. In it he quotes from the Parks Department reports of Superintendent Richard Iverson in which he lays out his plans for the development of Central Park, proposing elevation changes, mass plantings, the building of a bandstand and summer houses and the incorporation of two statues, the Boer War Memorial and an “Amazon Group”. Many of Iverson’s plans were executed and we know that there was a statue of an Amazon, riding a horse which was being attacked by a panther, installed in the flower bed in front of the library. You can see the rear view of the statue on the far right of this postcard of the library.

PC 1989

Central Library in Memorial Park, ca 1920?

Postcards from the Past, PC 1989

This statue was reportedly a copy of a famous statue by August Kiss, made for the entrance of the Altes Museum in Berlin. A copy was made from the original for the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Other copies appeared in various places. Our Amazon was a smaller, slightly altered, copy of the original. As described to the board by Superintendent Iverson, the statue was of an “Amazonian lady mounted on her trusty cayuse when a panther or some such animal started to chew the pony’s head off about the neck, whereupon the lady deftly inserted a spear into a section of his anatomy where it was likely to do the most harm. The board thought this was very fine but James Marr, with a twinkle in his eye, suggested the lady should be shown ‘wi’ a kilt. But it is likely that the lady’s chief adornment will be bronze.” (CH Mar 12, 1912)

The fate of our Amazon was sealed in 1922 when the I.O.D.E. received permission to place a memorial stature by Coeur-de-Lion McCarthy in the park. William Reader, the Superintendent at the time, suggested that it be installed near where the Amazon stood. He proposed that the Amazon be moved to Tompkins Park. By 1924, the Amazon and her “incongruous” perch were gone. As you may notice in the postcard below, a cannon was installed on the front lawn as well. This cannon (and its companions) had been captured from the German army. There were several in the city including one at the gates of Riley Park. It seems as though the ethos of the time preferred arms to bosoms.

PC 943

Central Library in Memorial Park, ca 1933

Postcards from the Past, PC 943

So what of the Amazon? The recommendation was to move it to Tompkins Park, but somehow it ended up in storage. In 1934 it was mounted on a piece of Tindall stone left over from the building of the Post Office and then placed in South Mount Royal Park where it was subsequently “mutilated and disfigured beyond repair by vandals.” This does not bode well for our Amazon. Did she end up in a landfill? Was she sold for scrap? We hope to find some more information about her fate so if you know anything please get in touch.

Xmas Gifts for the History Buff on Your List

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

Concrete Centenarian

There is nothing like a blizzard to get me started thinking about Christmas shopping. In particular, how much I don’t want to be out shopping in weather like this. So, with that in mind I thought I would pull together a little list of books and some other suggestions for gifts for the history lover in our lives.

This was a really good publishing year for local history. Many of our favourite historians released books that would be great presents not just for local history buffs, but for family or friends who don’t know our city, but should.

Here’s my list, in no particular order:

Development Derailed: Calgary and the CPR, 1962-1964by Max Foran. In June of 1962, the Canadian Pacific Railway announced a proposal to redevelop part of its reserved land in the heart of downtown Calgary. In an effort to bolster its waning revenues and to redefine its urban presence, the CPR proposed a multimillion dollar development project that included retail, office, and convention facilities, along with a major transportation centre.

The Flood of 2013: A Summer of Angry Rivers in Southern Alberta by the Calgary Herald; foreword by Mayor Naheed Nenshi. The Flood of 2013 chronicles an unforgettable summer of angry rivers, unprecedented flooding and undeniable human spirit. This gift is a “double give” as a portion of proceeds from the sale will go to the Calgary Foundation’s Flood Rebuilding fund.

Calgary LRT Walks: South Stations and Northwest Stations by David Peyto (available from Peyto Lake Books. One of the best ways to learn more about Calgary, to appreciate and enjoy the city, is on foot. Calgary LRT Walks describes many walks from LRT stations and include information on routes, buses, bathrooms and eateries.

River throws a tantrum by Rona Altrows; illustrated by Sarah-Joy Geddes is about one boy’s perception of the flood and evacuation. It was published by Pages Bookstore and read at one of their story times by Mayor Nenshi.

Concrete Centenarian: The Life and Death of Calgary’s Canadian Government Elevator by Scott Jolliffe looks at the history and demolition of the old Government elevator in Ogden. It is richly illustrated with the author’s photographs. Concrete Centenarian is available at many of the bookstores mentioned below. It is also available directly from the Calgary Heritage Authority for $30. For the CHA, email elevatorbookinfo@gmail.com

Marion Nicoll: Silence and Alchemy by Ann Davis, Elizabeth Herbert, Jennifer Salahub. Marion Nicoll is a widely acknowledged founder of Alberta art and certainly one of a dedicated few that brought abstraction into practice in the province. Her life and career is a story of determination, of dedication to her vision regardless of professional or personal challenges. She was the first female instructor hired by the school that is now ACAD.

Unbuilt Calgary: A History of the City That Might Have Been by Stephanie White. There have always been great plans afoot for Calgary. Stephanie White looks at some of the plans and what they would have meant for the city.

Wild Horses, Wild Wolves: Legends at risk at the foot of the Canadian Rockies by Maureen Enns. Ghost River Wilderness Area, located along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains in southern Alberta, is one of only three provincially designated wilderness areas in the province. It is in this beautiful, threatened and geographically remote area that Maureen Enns, a well-known artist, author, educator and conservationist, has come to discover an incredible world inhabited by wild horses, one of the region’s most elusive and iconic creatures.

Any one of these titles would make a great gift. Many of these books can be purchased at Chapters/Indigo but also check our local booksellers such as the Glenbow Museum Shop, Pages on Kensington, Shelf Life Books and Owl’s Nest.

Do you have a suggestion for a great local history book to give as a present? Please put your title in the comments and we'll add it to our list.

12345678910Showing 11 - 20 of 283 Record(s)