Latest Posts

Off Line

The Heritage Triangle PDF link

Happy Anniversary, Princess Patricia's

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 1673Currie Barracks "this is the cook"s house..."

For many years the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry was stationed here in Calgary at the Currie Barracks. They were back last week, as part of the Memorial Relay in which soldiers are running from Edmonton to Ottawa carrying a baton which contains the names of all 1,866 members who have fallen in active service.

The PPCLI was formed in 1914, in response to the declaration of war. Hamilton Gault, of Montreal, offered to raise and equip a regiment. In honour of the daughter of our then Governor General, the Duke of Connaught, the regiment was named the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. Princess Patricia personally designed its badge and colours for the regiment to take overseas to France. As the regiment's Colonel-in-Chief, she played an active role until her death. The PPCLI Colonel in Chief today is Adrienne Clarkson, our former GG

PC 1568Princess Patricia"s Mum and Dad, the Duke and Duchess of Connaught, 1912

Raised in August of 1914, the regiment was in France by September of the same year. They were the first of the Canadians to serve in that theatre of war. By December they had lost 238 men and their original Commanding Officer. In May of 1915 the Patricia’s saw action in the Ypres salient, meeting the enemy in the battle of Frezenberg. In mere hours, 175 men had died. The baton being carried in the relay will be taken to Frezenberg to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the battle known in the regiment as the “Death of the Originals.”

The PPCLI came to Calgary after the Second World War and were stationed at Currie Barracks. Shortly after their arrival, they were converted from a Regular Army brigade to an Airborne Mobile Striking Force. This change was enthusiastically received as many of the men had served in the First Parachute Brigade in WWII. The Patricia’s became Canada's first peacetime parachute battalion. If you would like to read more about the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, you can check out their website or read any one of the great books written about them. Maybe start with David Bercusons' recent publication, The Patricia's : A Century of Service

The PPCLI was an active part of the Calgary community until the decision was made to reduce the number of bases so the battalion was moved to Edmonton. We welcomed them back, though, with open arms

Yahoo! It's Stampede Time Again

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

1977 Stampede Poster1977 Stampede Poster from our Collection

Stampede time is upon us once again. The Parade went off without a hitch (at least I think it did) and we are now all kitted up in our very best cowboy gear. I love this time of year! Stephen Avenue is alive with visitors and weekend cowboys (and some real cowboys, too). There are buskers and vendors and food trucks and it is all being enjoyed by people from all over the world. They are here to partake of Calgary's unique personality as dazzling urbanite meets small town prairie good old boy. Yahoo, dawg.

 

1923 Stampede Poster1923 Stampede Poster from our Collection

 
 

Things were not much different 100 years ago. In early July of 1914 the Industrial Exhibition was under way. There were 7000 entries, surpassing the previous year’s numbers by nearly 2000. Over 700 babies were entered in the baby show (yes, that's what I said) and the Tuesday of the exhibition was "Better Babies" day. There were interesting performances, including an acrobatic troupe, an aeronaut who dropped a bomb from his balloon which, when exploded, "emits the aeronaut" and the "greatest number of musicians in the assembled bands that have ever appeared." The papers listed the all the winners of the competitions, see this link for a list of the winning chickens Right alongside the half page spread of prize poultry was an ad for shares in the Turner Valley Oil Company Ltd. ($1.00 a pop – a lot less than you'd pay for a prize hen) In fact, the newspaper was filled with advertisements for oil companies, punctuated with prize lists and race results. For the first time, oil derricks were set up around the grounds, primarily as advertisements for the companies drilling in the area. Salesmen were on hand to convince fairgoers that this was their chance to make it big. "Oil offices sprung up like magic and frantic representatives of the up town magnates were this morning dashing about in advanced state of frenzy, vainly attempting to get carpenters to do a dozen things at once.” Then, as now, the two worlds of Calgary existed side by side.

While our collection doesn't hold much about the 1914 Industrial exhibition, we do have an extensive collection of Stampede memorabilia including postcards, programmes, reports and posters, as evidenced by the two that grace this posting. The Stampede Archives has the poster for the 1914 exhibition and it eloquently sums up the two sides of this city; the fashionably clad young lady, with her equally fashionable collie, gazing lovingly at her prize winning horse. Need I say more.

1914 Industrial Exhibition poster1914 Calgary Industrial Exhibition from Calgary Stampede Archives

The Calgary Stampede Archives is a treasure trove of information about and images of the Calgary Exhibition and Stampede. Check out their wonderful collection to see more.

The Royal Visit, 1939

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

CrowdsCrowds in Calgary from Royal Visit Pictorial Review

 

Today is the 75th anniversary of the visit of Their Majesties King George VI and Queen Elizabeth to Calgary. It was the first visit by a reigning monarch to Canada. In today’s terms it would be as if Kanye and Kim decided to hold their wedding in our fair city. In other words it was a very big deal. The guns of the 19th Field Brigade fired the 21 gun royal salute, alerted by a signals officer perched on top of the Palliser Hotel. The roar of cannon could be heard all over the city.

As soon as the royal couple set foot on the platform, Pipe Major William Pow led the Pipe Band of the First Battalion Calgary Highlanders in the National Anthem (“God Save the King” in those days). The royal couple inspected the Highlanders honour guard, resplendent in their new uniforms, and the King complimented the commanding officer on the appearance of his men. Following the inspection, the King and Queen and every dignitary Calgary could muster, leapt into an eleven car fleet that would take the couple, via a very circuitous route, to City Hall. The crowds went wild. The Herald reported that the cheering was like the roar of a “mighty giant.”

Although the visit was only two hours long, it was jam packed, as you can see by the route map below. They passed the Cenotaph, drove through the cheering crowds that lined the roads to Cresent Road, where they would have a clear view of the city and the Rocky Mountains. At Mewata Park, a First Nations camp was set up by people of the Blackfoot, Stoney, Blood, Sarcee and Peigan tribes. Their Majesties were greeted by the sounds of drums and a chant of welcome. Duck Chief, Yellow Horn, Shot Both Sides, David Bearspaw, and Joe Big Plume, Chiefs of all the nations, were on hand to welcome the royals.

 

Route mapMap from Official Souvenir Program of the Visit of Their Majesties to Calgary

The newspapers were full of empire and majesty. The Calgary Herald “Royal Visit Edition” included an insert of 28 pages devoted to royal family and the empire, with lots of Canadian nationalism thrown in.

As the King and Queen left the city for Banff, patients from the Sanatorium were given a special treat when arrangements were made to have the Royal train slow down as it passed Keith. Patients got dressed in their finest and congregated on the lawn, hoping that their majesties would greet them from the observation deck.

 

PC 1061Their Majesties Leaving Calgary, Postcards from the Past

The day after the “biggest event in the city’s life” the police reported that the crowds were well behaved, there was no rowdyism and visitors had had the opportunity to see this city at its finest. Events were planned for their entertainment including an exhibition of the musical ride by Lord Strathcona’s Horse and a demonstration by 3rd Bomber Squadron’s Wapiti bombers at Currie Barracks. Many citizens placed pennies on the train tracks to be crushed by the royal train and provide souvenirs. The newspaper estimated that there was about thirty dollars worth of coin on the tracks.

It was certainly the biggest event in Calgary’s history. Commemorative publications were produced by the carload. We have a great many of these in our Local History collection at the Central Library (look in the catalogue under royal visitors 1939) as well as some of the postcards produced to commemorate the event. Check them out and share some of the excitement.

What did you get from Santa?

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 868

Parade along 8th Avenue (handwriting indicating "Papa's store" with arrow pointing to Linton Bros.), 1908

Postcards from the Past, PC 868

I no longer have little ones to buy presents for at Christmas, which is a shame because I love toys. I reminisce about my Mrs. Beasley doll and my Easy-Bake oven, or the little French telephone set and my Kenner Knit-O-Matic, all of which I see now advertised as vintage antiques. Sigh.

I know that this year kids will be asking for all kinds of electronics (although I’m heartened to see that one of the hottest toys this year is the Kendama, which doesn’t require batteries, a plug-in or any high-tech savvy.) And, as is my wont, I get to wondering about the history of it all. What kinds of things did kids in Calgary a hundred years ago get from Santa? I went rooting through my resources in the Local History room and found a wonderful resource at the Calgary Public Library for just this kind of browsing: the Eaton’s Catalogues on microfilm (which I am told is kind of an antique in itself). When I was a kid I got all of the items on my Santa list from the Eaton’s wish book. And it appears it was always thus.

Long before there was the internet, there was mail-order. The catalogues would arrive by mail, you would send your orders by mail (or later, you could order by telephone) and your stuff would be sent by mail. That could take some time, but you could also get things that weren’t easily available in your local community. That was especially important in remote areas, which was most of Western Canada back in the late 19th century. In fact, according to Collections Canada, the Eaton’s catalogue was sometimes called the Prairie Bible. You can access a great digitized collection of mail order catalogues at the Collections Canada site.

Train set

A page from the toy section of the 1913 Fall/Winter Eaton's Catalogue

So what did kids get for Christmas? There were some really cool things on offer. In the 1915 winter catalogue there were toy grocery store items, a submarine game, a big-game hunter set with a target bear, dollies, tea sets, cowboy outfits, a clothes washing set, complete with washboard and wringer and even a Ouija board!

What about earlier, though. Kids in 1897 might wish for a tricycle or a toy wheelbarrow. In 1886 the list of toys in the Eaton’s catalogue include dolls and accessories for them, dominoes and other games, a whistling steam engine, magic lanterns, musical instruments and riding, driving and dog whips (really!). Skates seem to have been a very popular item. There were sleighs and wagons and rocking horses to be had closer to home, however, as Linton’s had a Toyland on the second floor. Treats such as oranges, candy, figs, nuts and raisins, were also brought in by retailers for the season.

Whatever the gifts, Christmas has always been a time for family. Have a wonderful time with yours.

Lest We Forget

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

 

PC 1478

I.O.D.E. War Memorial in front of Memorial Park Library, ca 1920s

Postcards from the Past, PC 1478

 

Next Monday is Remembrance Day. It is the time of the year when we pay homage to those men and women who served our country. A great way to honour our military ancestors is to tell their story. I’ve pulled together a few sources to help you access information about Canada’s military.

I was recently made aware of couple of new databases that include information about our military ancestors. Last night the Jewish Historical Society of Southern Alberta launched its new database, Southern Alberta Jewish Veterans of World War I & II. The database aims to include those Jewish veterans of the two World Wars who spent a part of their lives in Southern Alberta.

The second database is of veterans of a much earlier war. The War of 1812 Veteran Graveside Project will provide a database of biographical information on thousands of veterans of the War of 1812. There is currently no national recognition for these veterans and many Canadians are unaware of the importance of this war to the founding of our country. The research for this database is done by historians, students and other interested parties. If you have an ancestor for whom you would like a graveside marker you can apply through the site.

There is a wealth of information for researching your military ancestor in Canada. AncestryLE (accessible at your Calgary Public Library branch) has a great selection of Canadian military records including selected records of soldiers who died in WWII, militia lists, lists of prisoners held by the Royal Navy in Canada at the beginning of the 19th century, and Canadian War Graves Registers, just to name a few.

 

PC 1590

Four Soldiers in Uniform in Calgary, ca 1915

Postcards from the Past, PC 1590

There is also very good access to military records through the Canadian Genealogy Centre. Records there date back to the French Regime and include links to war diaries and loyalist information. There are also service records from WWI and for those killed in action in World War II, as well as records from the rebellions and the Boer War.

Included in this treasure trove of military records is information about the Black Loyalists. This provides a great segue to our One Book One Calgary launch this Friday, November 8 where we will kick off the event with author Lawrence Hill and The Book of Negroes. Among the information provided under “Loyalists” in the military records at Library and Archives Canada is a link to the actual Book of Negroes which gave the novel its title. This list contains the names and information about many Black Loyalists and is a great resource for anyone researching their ancestors or anyone who is interested in the hidden history of the Black pioneers. Keep an eye on our website or check our program guide to find out about the great programs we have lined up to celebrate One Book One Calgary.

15th Light Horse Band

Postcards from the Past, PC 1264

PC 1264

Balmoral School Celebrates 100 Years

by Christine H - 4 Comment(s)

AJ 91 02

Balmoral School, 1968

Alison Jackson Photograph Collection, AJ 0571

While chatting with some friends at the Historic Calgary Week volunteer recognition event, I was reminded that Balmoral School was celebrating its 100th anniversary. Actually, the school had planned its celebrations for June 21, but we all know what happened on that day, so it was postponed until the new school year. On Friday September 13 the celebration was held and the new clock faces unveiled. There is a great deal of history in that clock tower.

Built in 1913, Balmoral school was the last and most expensive of the nineteen sandstone schools built by the school board between 1892 and 1914. The sandstone building boom ended with the onset of World War I. After the war many of the artisans who worked the stone had returned to their homes in Scotland. Other materials were available at a reasonable cost, so no more sandstone schools were built.

When it opened, Balmoral was an elementary school, with the Crescent Heights Collegiate sharing the building. William Aberhart was principle of Crescent Heights. The High School moved to its own building in 1929.

The defining characteristic of Balmoral School is its clock tower. It has stood blank-faced since the school was completed. Stories about the clock-that-never-was abound. A favourite is that the works for the clock were shipped to Canada on the Titanic. It’s a good story, except the Titanic was sunk in 1912, a year before the school was built. The true story is that, as war approached and the boom ended, there was no money for a clock for the school. Over the years different groups have tried to remedy the situation, but fundraising is a difficult thing and there was never enough money raised. There was even a song written about it:

Old clock tower overhead,
Still no clock when we go to bed
No clock wakes us in the morn
No clock since our school was born

Finally, a corporate donor, BP Energy, offered money to pay for a clock for the tower. Sadly, the years had taken their toll on the tower and to bring it up to a state where it could hold the clock would cost over 100,000 dollars. As a compromise, clock faces, without working mechanisms, were installed to fill in the painted wood faces. They indicate 4:05, which was the time of the end-of-school bell when the school first opened.

AJ 91 02

Balmoral School taken during a snowstorm, 1966

Alison Jackson Photograph Collection AJ 91-02

'88 Winter Olympics

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

Pam File


Come together in Calgary, Host city for the XV Olympic Winter Games, 1988

Promotional publication from the CHFH Collection

It is hard to believe (and even harder for me to admit) but it has been 25 years since the winter Olympics in Calgary in 1988. I was working at the Central Library at the time and it was the most wonderful and weird experience I have ever had. People from all over the world speaking languages I didn’t even know existed, were here in our little town. The place was really hoppin’ and we were here in the middle of it. For ten days we were a cosmopolitan city. And I think that once we had the taste of this worldliness, we were hooked. The city changed forever after 1988. We had been given the example of what we could be and we wanted it. We were Cowtown no more.

You can capture some of the optimism that gripped the city by checking out the documentary history of the Olympics. I’d forgotten what a treasure trove we have here in the Local History room until one of my colleagues from our Virtual Services popped down to see if we had anything cool she could photograph for our Facebook page. Well, that set me off on a tangent – sometimes we get carried away and return way too much information, just like Google. I uncovered endless shelves of material that we had collected from the time of the original idea, through the bid process and on through the development and then the games themselves. My colleague was entranced by the volunteer handbook - a major document handed out to all the Olympic volunteers along with their teal blue jackets. This was an appropriate item for her to feature, as it embodied, more than any other item, the spirit of those volunteers and the pride Calgary can take in the fact that this voluntarism continues to be a distinguishing characteristic of our city.

The Olympics made us feel special, and we’ve managed to hold on to that feeling. If you’d like to relive that magical moment, visit us at the Central Library on the 4th floor and check out some of the really cool items we have in the collection. We’d love to see you.

from news releases

Artist's rendering of the proposed Canada Olympic Park at Paskapoo, 1983

From a collection of press releases in the Local History collection

Merry Christmas, 1912 Style

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 152

Merry Christmas from the Carnegie Library, Calgary, Alberta

Postcards from the Past, PC 152 ca 1912

Whew, we’ve made it. It has been a year packed with lots of great events. This was the year of our 100th birthday, as well as the 100 year celebrations for many of the structures that were built during our 1912 boom. We were the City of culture for 2012 and we hosted a special edition of the Bob Edwards awards. The Mayan calendar came to an end and we are all still here, so all in all, the year was a great success. This will be my last chance to talk about the heady days of 1912 – and since 1913 marked the end of the boom, I am going to close out the year talking about what people were doing for Christmas in that year.

The weather was a bit chilly. The temperature was expected to go up to -1C after an overnight low of -13C.

Charity was a great part of Christmas in Calgary. The Morning Albertan’s Santa fund was over a thousand dollars and The Salvation Army was distributing over 100 food hampers (flour bags filled with necessities for a Christmas celebration) to needy families and providing pastries to people in jail. They also held a Christmas dinner for needy single men.

But giving was also on the agenda, as always. The Calgary post office was overwhelmed with letters and parcels from the Old Country (England). Three special trains were sent west with parcels from the Empress of Ireland.

Pryce Jones stayed open until 11 o’clock on the 23rd and 24th to accommodate those last minute shoppers. The store was offering a new and chic accoutrement for the autoists (i.e people who had cars) – foot muffs. These intriguing little goodies would fit both tender feet of the “fair autoists” (i.e. girls in cars) and would swathe them in fur, to keep them from freezing in the unheated and mostly open automobiles. These little luxuries ran from $3.00 to $12.50 depending on the amount and quality of the furs used. You could have these gifts delivered to your door on Christmas Eve.

Hudson’s Bay was even more modern, offering gift certificates for those who just couldn’t decide on what gift to give.

Senator Lougheed announced that “Miss Calgary”, our dear city, was getting some great presents including a new million dollar post office, a customs warehouse, immigration building and an armory.

As a reaction to this frenetic holiday season a group was formed in New York calling itself, SPUG, the Society for the Prevention of Useless Giving. The idea spread like wildfire among the young, fashionable club men and women who believed that society had moved away from the fun and good times spent with family and friends and focused too much on the money one spends.

Food, as much a part of Christmas celebrations as Useless Giving, was very much on the minds of our Calgarians, albeit with a bit of a different twist. Restaurants were getting ready for the rush of Christmas diners. Some didn’t change their menus much, except to add turkey, but the Club Café had an unexpected delicacy to offer, a black bear cub. Many homemakers were planning to roast a fat capon, in lieu of the expected turkey as the capons were less expensive and tastier and the leftovers could be used to prepare various chicken dishes and dainties. The secret to a good capon was the use of fatty bacon as a wrapping as well the liberal application of butter (I think you could probably roast a cardboard box with fatty bacon and butter and make a passable meal!) Stuff that with bread crumbs and a half pound of truffles which have been soaked in Madeira, a goose liver and, of course, bacon and you will have a feast fit for a king.

So, it seems that nothing has really changed, eh? We are still rushing about in the cold, desperate to get that last minute gift and falling back on the gift certificate when we just can’t make up our minds. Young people are still objecting to the commercialization of Christmas, while homemakers are still trying to find the best way to cook a peculiar and rather unpleasant bird to make it palatable. We are still faced with the fact that not everyone will be able to have a happy Christmas, but we are still showing what a great city we are by giving to charities that try to ensure a decent Christmas for the less fortunate. So, my wish for you is that you enjoy the holidays, however you may spend them.

Christmas Picture

Vimy Ridge

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 1478

IODE War Memorial, Central Park

Postcards from the Past, PC 1478

Last week we celebrated the 95th anniversary of Vimy Ridge. It is said that the Canadian action at Vimy was the turning point for Canada. Before Vimy we were a frozen outpost of the British Empire, after Vimy we were a nation. That bit of information is certainly crucial to an understanding of Canada’s role in the Great War . But I am a bit of a micro-historian myself. I believe that we can also come to an understanding of the impact of world events by understanding the role of individuals in those events. This ties in nicely with my interest in genealogy, but it has also served me well in a new role I have taken on. Library and Archives Canada have a project called Lest We Forget, which involves collaboration with libraries around the country. The goal of this program is to bring the lives of Canadian soldiers to students in high schools by exposing them to primary source documents, in this case, the service records of men and women from their geographic area. I was a little leery of this to begin with. I love working with primary sources but I’m not sure if that is a sign of some dysfunction or if there might be others out there who get the same thrill from dusty old papers. Well, the students we have come in contact with seem to have the same feeling about micro-history and primary source materials that I do. Who knew? So now with this affirmation in hand, I am spreading the word about primary source research and Canada’s military history.

All of this leads me to Private Thomas Lawless. One thing that was really driven home by my involvement in Lest We Forget is the absolute horror of the battlefield. Photos of no-man’s land show a churned up, muddy pit of horse carcasses and dead bodies. It was, to belabor an obvious point, a chaotic nightmare where the niceties of tradition could not be observed. Bodies sometimes had to be left where they fell. Thomas Lawless was one of these soldiers who were left behind. As a matter of fact, his body was not discovered until 2003, and therefore he was still on the missing list until 2011, when scientists were finally able to confirm his identity. Thomas was from Ireland, but lived in Calgary when he enlisted, on November 22, 1915. He was 27, had sandy hair and a fresh complexion. He arrived in England in June of 1916 on the Olympia, but seems to have immediately contracted tonsillitis, which seemed to be a chronic problem for him, and was admitted to hospital. He ran a fever for a short while but by July he was fit enough to rejoin his regiment. After he died, his next of kin, listed as Mrs.K. Johnstone of 8th Street West, Calgary, received $275.46 of his back pay. His brother in Ireland received his medals.

How do I know all of this about Thomas? His service records have been digitized and made available by Library and Archives Canada. You can access the Soldiers of the First World War database here: http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/cef/001042-100.01-e.php

As the files that we are using in the Lest We Forget project are scanned, they are also put in this database. So while some records only include the attestation papers (but you can order the files if you want to see them) some include the entire service record. If you are researching an ancestor, or have seen a name on a cenotaph that you would like to pursue more information about, check out the Soldiers of the First World War database.

And just on a more personal note, some of the students from one of the schools in the Lest We Forget project are in France and were a part of the celebrations at Vimy. They are also going to visit the battlefields. They all carry their soldier’s story with them and I’m certain they will see the Great War through new/old eyes.

Attestation Paper LAC


Attestation paper of Thomas Lawless

Soldiers of the First World War database, Library and Archives Canada

Titanic - The Calgary Connection

by Christine H - 1 Comment(s)

Public domain

Titanic in Southampton, April 1912

One hundred years ago, on April 15, the Titanic went down. It took three days for the ship that rescued the survivors, the Carpathia, to reach New York but when it did, there was media frenzy and 250 policemen had to be on hand to control the crowd and make sure that only family and friends of the survivors had access to them. In spite of that, the press got through, one even making it onto the Carpathia. The papers were full of the stories of the survivors and many of the tales surrounding the sinking of that magnificent ship were born.

One of the most enduring examples of the heroism that was seen the night of the loss was that the band played as the lifeboats were loaded in order to keep the passengers calm. It was reported that the band continued to play even as the ship went down. Interestingly, the first report of this came from Vera Dick, a Calgary woman, who had been on the Titanic returning from her honeymoon. In an interview, said to be “one of the most comprehensive and connected stories of the disaster,” Vera reported that “as the steamship went down, the band was up forward and we could faintly hear them start ‘Nearer my God to Thee’.” She continued, “There was no evidence of panic while we were on board and I first laughed at the idea of the Titanic sinking.” (The Morning Leader, April 19, 1912).

Vera’s husband, Albert (known as Bert) kept fairly quiet about the disaster until he reached Calgary. Then he gave his report to a reporter in New York and the interview was picked up by The Calgary Daily Herald (April 19, 1912). His report is essentially the same as Vera’s but he adds that while Vera was in her nightdress and kimono, he managed to get into his pants and jacket. He also had high praise for the crew, who maintained order in the face of mounting panic and stayed with the ship until the end.

Following the disaster, the few men who survived were looked on with suspicion. The rule at sea is ‘women and children first’ and, while most of the women and children (at least those in first and second class) were saved, it is often overlooked that a boatload of women and children would have been expected to need men to row the boats. Women, especially those in the privileged classes, were not encouraged to undertake vigorous physical exercise. It was for this reason, claimed Vera, that her husband was forced into the boat with her. Indeed, the reports of the survivors are filled with reports of crew members and other men taking charge of the lifeboats and rowing them away from the suction of the great liners’ sinking.

In addition to Mr. and Mrs. Dick, it was reported that the family of Frank Marshall, a carpenter living in the Riverside area of Calgary, were also on board. His wife and two children were initially reported missing but I can find no further information about them (and they aren’t listed on the passenger lists I have seen) Reports, sent through the company of Niblock and Tull, agents for White Star in Calgary, indicated that Kate Marshall was rescued. It appears, however, that Kate Marshall was travelling with her husband and was not related to Frank. Does anyone know about this family? I’d be interested to hear if they were on the ship or if this was a bit of a hoax.

 

If you'd like to read some of the news reports from the time of the event, you can check out our two subscription services "Toronto Star: Pages from the Past" and "Globe & Mail: Canada's Heritage from 1844" both of which are in our E-Library under "History and Genealogy." You can also check the newspapers at Our Future Our Past and the newspapers in Peel's Prairie Provinces.

Photo of Albert Dick from interview

Calgary Daily Herald, April 19, 1912

Albert Dick from Calgary Daily Herald

123Showing 1 - 10 of 26 Record(s)