You are here: Home > Blogs > Library-Connect
On Line

Library Connect banner

Wedding Planning at the Library

by Stephen - 0 Comment(s)

The idea of planning a wedding didn’t seem so bad. After all I’d been to a lot of them. Walk down the aisle, eat some food, dance and we’re done!

Practical Weddings

 

 

 

When we first sat down to start planning, I was thinking I’d like something like this

 

 

Wedding Planning for Dummies

 

although I was actually at the level of this

 

 

 

 

Rustic Chic Weddings

 

 

because I had no idea that things like this even existed.

 

 

 

 

Little did I know that I was entering a world full of chair covers, buntings, post-wedding brunches, vegetarian stuffed peppers and DIY decorating. One bruised ego and 250 origami flowers later, I realized that maybe this wasn’t so simple. Thankfully the Calgary Public Library’s collection was there to help me out.

 Knot Guide to Wedding Vows & Traditions

 

The Library has a selection of DVDs, books and eBooks to help you plan for that big, wonderful, stressful, fantastic, what have we gotten ourselves into day! The Knot guides are a great place to start with organizing the wedding as whole, or even just the ceremony itself. Where should your venue be? What kind of music will you play? Should you incorporate a traditional ritual, or make one up? Knot Guides can help you through both the big and small decisions.

 

 

  Be the Man Registry

 

By far the majority of wedding books out there are written with the bride in mind, but thankfully I stumbled across this gem which covers everything from budgeting to that first dance for the groom. This is a great all-around guide which also incorporates humorous stories and anecdotes which can go a long way towards lightening the mood. The book also quickly dispels the stereotype that weddings are just for the bride.

 

 

 

 

Once we had an idea of where, how and when we wanted to get married, I was able to find a few books that helped me with some of the specifics. My first task was to buy a suit. After spending an hour with a tailor and all of that measuring tape, my first checkout was this:

Drop 20 Pounds in 2 Months

Being somewhat chea... err… fiscally responsible, we decided that the best photographer was probably someone who was related to us. That’s where Wedding Photography Unveiled: Inspiration and Insight from 20 Top Photographers came in handy.

Finally, does room/budget for 50 guests + our combined 150 relatives = a lifetime of awkward family reunions? Not to worry, the Library carries this good old standby in etiquette, Emily Post!

So if you are planning to get married (and eloping isn’t an option) check out the Calgary Public Library’s wedding planning collection for great advice and practical ideas.

What Makes a Great Homebound Readers Volunteer?

by Katie R - 0 Comment(s)

Linda began delivering materials to Library customers in 2009 after moving to Calgary. Like most volunteers, she wanted to contribute her time and energy to something that holds personal meaning and interest for her. As an avid reader, Linda shares a passion for books with the customers she serves.

"One of the things I enjoy most is meeting other book lovers, talking about genres and authors we have in common, and sharing information about new reading possibilities. It’s been an unexpected benefit to become more familiar with the various technologies available to readers, particularly through the Calgary Public Library system.

From the moment she began volunteering, staff knew Linda would be a great volunteer. Linda is responsive to her readers’ needs, is highly organized, asks thoughtful questions, and displays a great deal of understanding and humour in demanding situations. Many Calgary Public Library volunteers go above and beyond their formal volunteer role, and Linda is no exception. In the past she went so far as to assist one woman with her garden because it brought the reader so much joy.

The Homebound Readers program is effective because committed and caring individuals are willing to brighten the days of customers who cannot visit libraries due to health or mobility concerns. This valuable service keeps essential literacy skills from declining due to accessibility issues and promotes overall health through enjoyment of library materials in a variety of formats. If you know of anyone who can benefit from this service, please contact 403-260-2703 for more information.

New Books in Favourite Series

by Betsy - 0 Comment(s)

Bridgertons: Happily Ever AfterBridgertons: Happily Ever AfterSum of All KissesSum of All KissesJulia Quinn first introduced readers to the Bridgerton family in a light and humourous 8-book romance series. The books allowed readers to follow the tribulations of eight alphabetically named siblings (Anthony, Benedict, Colin, Daphne, Eloise, Francesca, Gregory, and Hyacinth), while enjoying the London background and a fairly substantial set of characters around whom the stories came to be told, including the formidable and forthright Lady Danbury, the definitely unmusical Smythe-Smith family, and the mysterious gossip columnist Lady Whistledown. All of these characters eventually take center stage in their own right in other books, and indeed the Smythe-Smith clan eventually does get their own series. This 'easter egg' (or crossover) effect allows readers to catch up with characters with whom they are familiar and have an affinity, while allowing new readers to start up a series. A prime example of this is the use of a particularly horrid romance novel that is either passed around or which all of the characters seem to end up reading and discussing.

This fall Ms. Quinn's two new books will present readers with either a visit back to not only all of the Bridgertons, but their mother, Violet, with an additional epilogue intended to answer potential questions or tie up any possible loose ends from each of the original eight books in The Bridgertons: Happily Ever After, and yet another unlikely couple will meet up at a Smyth-Smith wedding (one of the three from The Lady Most Willing), in The Sum of All Kisses, under the stern and amused eye of Lady Danbury. August is ReadaRomance month, and Julia Quinn's post will be added to the R-A-R site, which has posts by 93 contributing authors, on August 25th.


StormbreakerStormbreakerRussian RouletteRussian RouletteYounger readers will be familiar with Anthony Horowitz as the author of the Alex Rider series. We first met Alex in Stormbreaker, when officers came to his school to tell him that his guardian and uncle, Ian, had been killed in an auto accident. Alex initial suspicions about his uncle's death will set him on a chilling and dangerous path as an MI6 operative and into a life of danger, one that eventually spanned nine books and four graphic novels, with Alex as a teenage secret agent dealing with spies and a life that seemed ever more out of his control.

This fall, Mr. Horowitz is set to release a prequel to the series called Russian Roulette: the story of an assassin, in which readers will get the backstory of Yassen Gregorowich, a boy who will grow up to be Alex's mirror image, and become the man who kills Alex's father.

Are there authors that you wish would revisit a character or a series that you really like, or that reintroduce moments from earlier efforts into their books in a particularly enjoyable way?

A House in the Sky by Amanda Lindhout

by Jan S - 0 Comment(s)

A House in the SkyA House in the Sky By Amanda LindhoutOne book that is getting a lot of buzz is a memoir by Canmore resident, and journalist Amanda Lindhout. In August 2008 Lindhout was abducted and held hostage for 15 months. At the time, her abduction was in the news and her plight became a political debate about whether the governments should pay ransoms for citizens held hostage in foreign countries. A House in the Sky, is Amanda's memoir about what she experienced during those months.

A House in the Sky starts with Amanda's childhood living in Sylvan Lake with her mom and brothers. As a young girl she becomes fascinated by the exotic places and pictures found in old copies of National Geographic magazines. What started as a means of escape from a less than perfect home life, becomes a passion for travelling that takes Amanda throughout the world.

It is during her travels that Amanda becomes a freelance journalist and decides to travel to Somalia. In Somalia, while on her way to visit a refugee camp Amanda and four others are taken hostage by a group of fundamentalists. For 460 days Amanda endures horrific conditions and both physical and mental abuse at the hands of her captors.

The book is about more than just the abuse suffered by Amanda; it's about her spirit to survive and not give into the despair of her situation. Throughout her ordeal and in the years that have followed, Lindhout maintains her belief in the goodness of people. She writes about her feelings now towards the people that abused her and she expresses an understanding for their actions. That stayed with me after I finished this book and it's why I couldn't pull myself away from her story.

Through the non-profit organization that she founded, Amanda Lindhout has worked to improve conditions in Somalia epecially in the area of education for women. And despite everything she has been through, she has even gone back to Somalia to do humanitarian work. A remarkable woman and a remarkable book.

A House in the Sky will be released in September and you can currently place holds on both the book and bookCD.

20,000 Books Under The Bow was a HUGE success!

by Katie R - 0 Comment(s)

This past Saturday, The Calgary Public Library Foundation organized their 20,000 Books Under The Bow Book Drive in order to help with the Library's flood recovery efforts. Clearly Calgarians love their library – more than 200,000 items were donated at locations across the city, well above and beyond everyone’s expectations!

Over 150 fantastic Calgary Public Library volunteers worked tirelessly all day on Saturday (and some through the rain) to run the project – sorting donations, packing and moving boxes, and giving Calgarians more information about how they can help support their library at this time. These donated items will be collected by Better Worlds Books and proceeds will help restock collections lost and damaged in the flood.

A huge THANK YOU goes out to all the volunteers who made this day such a great success, and of course THANKS to everyone who stopped by their local library to donate books and support their library.

If you are interested in helping out, cash donations can still be made at calgarypubliclibraryfoundation.ca and 20,000 Books Under the Bow T-shirts can still be purchased at goodread.myshopify.com online.

Check out more coverage of the 20,000 Books Under The Bow project here.

Foxy. Manga.

by Laura C - 0 Comment(s)

Kitsune at the Fushimi Inari Shrine, Kyoto

Once you've started to read a few manga (Japanese comics) you begin to notice some trends: repeated symbols, plot-lines, art styles, etc. One of these is the motif of the kitsune (fox spirit). The kitsune is associated with numerous Japanese myths and legends and is at home in many fantasy manga series.

In Japan, good kitsune are most famously associated with (and companion to) the shinto diety Inari Okami, the god of foxes, fertility, rice, tea, sake, harvest, industry (among other things). There are over 30,000 shrines dedicated to this deity in Japan, the most famous (and main shrine) being the Fushimi Inari Shrine in Kyoto. This is one of the featured locations in the film Memoirs of a Geisha.

The fox is present in many different aspects of Japanese culture. For example, if you're a sushi fan, you'll recognize the name Inari Zushi (taking its name from the deity); these deep-fried tofu packets resemble the shape of a fox -- and just happen to be a favourite snack of the kitsune (and mine, as well). Find out more about mythology by doing a search in the Gale Virtual Reference Library found in our E-Library.

In manga, there is no end to allusions of the kitsune/fox spirit. Try some of these:

Naruto by Masashi Kishimoto is one of the library's most popular manga series. It's an adventure series whose title character's great dream is to become Hokage, the greatest ninja of the leaf village. To do this he will have to learn to tap into the fearful power of the nine-tail demon fox which has been sealed within him... but first, he has to pass ninja training.

Foxes are not usually referred to as "good" creatures in Japanese mythology and it is not unusual for Japanese foxes to have many tails; they can have as many as nine. The more tails a fox has the older and more powerful it is.

The nine-tailed fox in Naruto is definitely a force to be reckoned with!

Inu Yasha by Rumiko Takahashi is a romantic/adventure series starring Kagome, an average school-girl transported to ancient Japan through an old well. There she discovers that she is the reincarnation of a priestess who once protected the powerful Shikon jewel (which has the power to grant its possessor their wish). When the jewel shatters, scattering pieces across Japan, Kagome must team-up with half-demon Inu-Yasha to reclaim all of the pieces before they fall into the wrong hands.

There are a number of kitsune in this series, including their adorable traveling companion Shippou. But, the most important reference is actually the shikon jewel. The jewel is a common symbol of the kitsune and some tradition even suggests that if you return the jewel to a kitsune it will grant you a wish.

Kamisama Kiss by Julietta Suzuki is the story of high-schooler Nanami who after saving a stranger from a dog is given his home to live in. As she has recently been abandoned by her father and homeless she accepts the gift only to find out that the home she's been given is not a house, but a decrepit shrine and she has become the new earth deity. She works hard in her new role -- and begins to have feelings for her new companion and protector, the fox-spirit Tomoe.

This story essentially twists the elements of the Inari Okami myth with his kitsune companion and turns it into a fun and frolicking romantic-comedy.

Spice & Wolf by Isuna Hasakura is the story of Kraft Lawrence, a 25-year-old traveling merchant who, while traveling through the town of Pasroe, discovers the stow-away wolf/girl named Holo (the wise-wolf) in his cart. She happens to be Pasroe's harvest goddess. Believing that the town no longer has use for her she convinces Lawrence to take her with him on his travels in an attempt to return home.

Despite writing Holo as a wolf instead of a fox, the author seems to have taken elements from several kitsune myths to create her character, including: her wisdom, her ability to transform into human form, and her association with the harvest.

3456789101112Showing 43 - 48 of 497 Record(s)