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    Book Club in a Bag

    Graphic Novel Roundup

    by Sonya - 0 Comment(s)

    I occasionally pick up a graphic novel, often memoirs or biographical fiction, and I am rarely disappointed! Here's a brief roundup of some newer releases that I've got my eye on, as well as a few older gems that you might enjoy.

    If you liked Persepolis:

    Unterzakhn by Leela Corman

    It didn't take more than looking at the cover to get this title on my reading list, but a few words from the catalogue's summary just make it sound that much more interesting:

    "A mesmerizing, heartbreaking graphic novel of immigrant life on New York's Lower East Side at the turn of the 20th century, as seen through the eyes of twin sisters whose lives take radically and tragically different paths."

    A friend who's just read it raved about the novel, and the characters that were so real that she read up on the author and the novel to learn about their lives (only to confirm that it's fiction).

    Susceptible by Geneviève Castrée

    This latest release by a young Canadian graphic novelist reads like a memoir, intimate and thoughtful. Read the summary (from our catalogue):

    "Geneviève Castrée has long been beloved for her mini-comics, comics, visual art, and music. There is a unique quality to all of her artistic endeavors: quiet, serene, depressing. Castree's keen eye for detail and her fearless ability to probe the depths of her troubled past make Susceptible a stirring portrait of an artist coming into her own.

    Susceptible is the story of Goglu, a daydreamer growing up in Quebec in the '80s and '90s with a single mother. From a skillful artist comes a moving, beautiful story about families, loss, and growing up. Whether she's discussing nature versus nurture or the story of her birth, Castree imbues her storytelling with a quiet power and a confidence in the strength of imagery."

    A slice of life:

    Building Stories by Chris Ware

    This wonderful assortment of pamphlets, mini-comics in paperback form, posters, hardcover graphic novels and other media comes in a big box. Among all the items included in the box, we learn the life stories, woes and preoccupations of the tenants in one apartment building. A truly unique format that enlivens the stories it contains!

    Aya: Love in Yop City by Marguerite Abouet

    I can't wait to read this next installment in the series about Aya. Set in Ivory Coast in the 1970s, the tone is light and easy, telling the stories of the daily lives of Aya and her circle of friends, neighbours and acquaintances. If you're new to this series, you should read them in order: start with Aya, then Aya of Yop City, then Aya: the secrets come out.

    From the catalogue summary:

    "Aya: Love in Yop City comprises the final three chapters of the Aya story, episodes never before seen in English. Aya is a lighthearted story about life in the Ivory Coast during the 1970s, a particularly thriving and wealthy time in the country's history. While the stories found in Aya: Love in Yop City maintain their familiar tone, quick pace, and joyfulness, we see Aya and her friends beginning to make serious decisions about their future.

    This second volume of the complete Aya includes unique appendices & recipes, guides to understanding Ivorian slang, street sketches, and concluding remarks from Marguerite Abouet explaining history and social milieu. Inspired by Abouet's childhood, the series has received praise for offering relief from the disaster-struck focus of most stories set in Africa."


    Fantastical fiction:

    Habibi by Craig Thompson

    This epic story reads like a timeless fairy tale, and the sumptuous visuals will mesmerize and enchant you! I've previously posted a review, here, but since I was so taken with the book, I couldn't resist adding it to this list. For me, this easily takes a place in my "must reads."

    Tales from Outer Suburbia by Shaun Tan

    This author is one of my favourites, although my first encounter with his work was The Arrival, a gorgeous, wordless tale of moving to a new land. Tales from Outer Suburbia, on the other side of the "words-versus-pictures" graphic novel continuum, is more like a collection of quirky, illustrated short stories. The stories and illustrations are charming and eccentric, perfect for a rainy afternoon spent in a cozy spot.

    From our catalogue summary:

    "Breathtakingly illustrated and hauntingly written, Tales from Outer Suburbia is by turns hilarious and poignant, perceptive and goofy. Through a series of captivating and sophisticated illustrated stories, Tan explores the precious strangeness of our existence. He gives us a portrait of modern suburban existence filtered through a wickedly Monty Pythonesque lens. Whether it's discovering that the world really does stop at the end of the city's map book, or a family's lesson in tolerance through an alien cultural exchange student, Tan's deft, sweet social satire brings us face-to-face with the humor and absurdity of modern life."

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