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    Book Club in a Bag

    Off the Shelf: Maya's Notebook by Isabelle Allende

    by Sonya - 0 Comment(s)

    At first the dual settings of Maya’s Notebook seem to engender culture clash. Maya, recovering drug addict, has been sent to remote Chiloé, the southern island area of Chile from Los Vegas, the place of her willful captivity in the drug culture. Gradually, author Isabel Allende draws out the nuances of the two societies, showing us the modern world’s cultural symbiosis.

    Maya’s grandparents are her bedrock. Emotionally and often physically abandoned by her parents, she grows up spoiled (as she admits) by her eccentric Chilean grandmother and her warmly loving American grandfather. Rules are loose, when they exist, in favour of creativity and spontaneity. The family is so passionate that they collapse when struck with tragedy.

    Sent to Chile in a protective exile by her grandmother, Maya has been instructed to keep a notebook of everything she does, thinks and feels. In exile, her home is made with a friend of her grandmother, a taciturn professor who is writing a book about the myths and anthropology of Chiloé. Modern Maya, banned from using the internet and without most of her electronics, drops into an eighteenth century village. After she learns to stop chattering and rebelling, she begins to appreciate the genuine strength and friendship of a self-sufficient community.

    Maya’s Notebook moves ahead and backwards in a well-modulated rhythm. The joy of her early life helps her make friends in the village. Her knowledge of the wider world helps her see that the village is not so very isolated. Committed to sobriety, she takes full responsibility for her rehabilitation, while recognizing that she needs the emotional support of others. As she becomes sensitive to the troubles of other people in the community, she begins to assess her own period of self-destruction and sheer danger. Her evident healing encourages her friends and neighbours to include her in their traditions and beliefs.

    With great skill, Isabel Allende offers the reader the opportunity to join Maya on a journey of self discovery and cultural exploration.

    Judith Umbach

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