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    It's a Cat's World

    by Dieu - 2 Comment(s)

    It seems to me that in recent times cats have become the internet celebrities of the animal kingdom. Obvious examples like the famous Grumpy Cat, aka, Tardar Sauce, with his own line of books, t-shirts and plush toys, the video of a cat saving a little boy from a dog attack that quickly went viral, and whole blogs devoted to the weird and cute world of cats have proven that most of us have gone officially cat crazy.

    I admit, I am also one of those guilty of ailurophilia (a love of cats). If like me, you can’t get enough of anything cat related, why not peel yourself away from the infnite scroll of the internet and dip into some literary fiction about these lovely creatures?

    I Am a Cat book cover

    I always think of cats as mysterious creatures who tend to treat us humans with some aloofness. Soseki Natsume’s novel, I Am a Cat, hilariously imagines what exactly cats think about us. Set in Meiji era Japan, the novel follows a cat who spends most of his time observing human nature, making wisecracks on what he sees as the clear inferiority and silliness of humans, and in general providing amusing stories of the activities going on around him. One of the more humorous bits in the novel:

    This must have been the very first time that ever I set eyes on a human being. The impression of oddity, which I then received, still remains today. First of all, the face that should be decorated with hair is as bald as a kettle. Since that day I have met many a cat but never have I come across such deformity.

    I consider The Guest Cat by Takashi Hiraide, a book recently added to the Library’s collection, as a little gem of a novel. A New York Times bestseller, and a bestseller in France, The Guest Cat is about two writers, a young couple, who become friends with a neighbor’s cat. One day, the cat they name Chibi, visits them. Eventually, she makes their little cottage a second home and over time Chibi tints their lives with happiness and light. Like a cat, Hiraide’s novel has a relaxing charm and grace to it in its quietness. A novel about love and loss, and the everyday brief lovely moments of life, The Guest Cat is one of those rare books that stay with you over time.

    Other great reads for cat lovers:

    The Guest Cat book cover

    Trick or Treat!

    by Sonya - 0 Comment(s)

    If books are what you prefer for a "treat" at this time of year (or if you need something to do while you work your way through the candy bowl), pick up a horror novel or a collection of classic ghost stories!

    It's been a long while since I've intentionally picked up something scary to read... but I still remember not being able to sleep after finishing Stephen King's The Shining in the middle of the night!

    If you're in the mood for something spooky and seasonal, check out some of these sites:

    Calgary Public Library

    Start with us! Browse Horror fiction search results in our Catalogue and try using Novelist Plus in the E-Library to find your favourite type of spooky reading material. Sign in to Novelist using your library card number.

    Flavorwire

    Flavorwire has some fun lists, including both the 50 Scariest Books of All Time and, my favourite, A Highbrow Halloween Reading List. Who knew Halloween could be highbrow?

    Boston.com

    This site has a nice varied list of Season's readings, including a selection of classic and contemporary horror stories and a non-fiction tome on all things to do with chocolate candy!

    Goodreads

    See what people of all ages list as the most Popular Halloween Reads.

     

    What is your favourite horror story? Leave a suggestion in the comments.

    Your Fall Reading List is Here

    by Sonya - 1 Comment(s)

    Now that the "September rush" is over—Yikes! October already!—are you looking for something new to read? Find out which books are the most talked about, read reviews, and see what will go on your own reading list. I've compiled a few links to various recommended reading lists, and for once, I've also finished reading one of the hot new titles that appears on several of the lists! So, I'll start with my own recommendations and go from there.

    Margaret Atwood's MaddAddam completes her dystopian trilogy that started with Oryx and Crake and The Year of the Flood. [Spoiler alert: if you haven't read them, stop reading this right now and go read Oryx and Crake!] The first two novels presented alternate, and interwoven, viewpoints of the same timeline of events in a chillingly believable future version of our world. Genetically modified organisms and genetic-enhancement cosmetic procedures abound; powerful "Corps" control money, media, politics, and the lives and deaths of the nameless masses trying to survive the toxic pleeblands. Various secret groups and splinter cults try to undermine or avoid the influence of the Corps... and one young scientific genius, Crake, either madman or visionary, has had enough. Crake engineers both the mass extinction of humanity and the birth of a new type of human. MaddAddam continues the story as a handful of humans, together with the "Crakers," try to survive in the aftermath.

    If, like me, you are fascinated by the complex world and characters Atwood created in the first two novels, you have to read the third. What I loved about this novel is it allows us to discover the Crakers both as individuals and as a new culture, as this culture develops. There is also the thread of storytelling, and how it is linked to our legends and beliefs. Atwood is a master storyteller and weaves her magic once again in this novel. Along with the feeling of completion and melancholy having just finished reading MaddAddam, I also feel anticipation—time to go back to Oryx and Crake and read them all again.

    CBC Fall Reading List:

    On this list, you'll find both Atwood's latest and Lawrence Hill's Massey Lecture, Blood: the Stuff of Life. If you haven't read anything from Lawrence Hill, now is the perfect time! His fantastic novel The Book of Negroes, which I've blogged about before, is the chosen book for this year's One Book, One Calgary events.

     

    Quill & Quire Canadian:

    More notable Canadian fiction, including both new and familiar names.

    Quill & Quire International:

    Among new efforts from several big names, including Stephen King, Elizabeth Gilbert, Amy Tan, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Chuck Palanhiuk, the one that caught my eye is The Guts by Roddy Doyle, described as a sequel to his breakout novel The Commitments. This time around, the characters first introduced as young musicians in a band are middle aged family guys, and dealing with cancer. With Doyle's signature warmth and humour, it should be a good one.

     

    Publisher's Weekly Fall Books Preview:

    This extensive list (with reminders to check back as more titles are added) includes material for all ages, with links to more in-depth listings. One that caught my eye is a debut fiction novel from a True Crime writer. If that sounds interesting, check out The Edge of Normal by Carla Norton. The plot involves the kidnapping of a 13-year old girl.

    Oprah's Books into Movies:

    One of my all-time favourite novels, The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak, appears on this list. Personally, I always read the book first (and, truthfully, am often disappointed by movie adaptations), so if this one's slipped under your radar, now is the time to read it before the movie is released. Although categorized as a young adult novel, this one transcends age boundaries and has wide appeal. To paraphrase the summary in our catalogue: "[i]n superbly crafted writing that burns with intensity, award-winning author Markus Zusak has given us one of the most enduring stories of our time." This unforgettable novel, narrated by Death, is the story of a young girl living in a small German town in 1939.

     

    What's on your reading list this fall? Let us know in the comments.