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Teen Writer's Toolkit: What to Read

by Emily - 2 Comment(s)

Welcome to the second installment of the Teen Writer's Toolkit! This week I want to provide a resource of great books and websites on writing for you to check out. What's the best part about this list? All of the books on it are available at the library, and of course the websites you can visit for free, so you don't have to pay a dime for all this writing advice!

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft - Stephen King

I read this book a long time ago, but it's still one of my favourites. For the first half of the book King provides a memoir about how he became a writer and I have to tell you, there's nothing more satissfying than knowing that he too wrote his fair share of crummy stories and got mountains of rejection letters. Nobody gets to be a literary icon overnight, that's for sure.

The second half of his book is all of the advice he has for writers. I must admit I'm not a fan of King's fiction, he's just not my thing, but he is a good writer and his tips are helpful no matter what you're writing. A lot of his advice has stayed with me over the years, so I hope it'll be helpful for you too.

Sarah Selecky's Website

Sarah Selecky is one of my favourite fiction writers. I read her book of short stories This Cake is for the Party a couple of years ago and fell in love. I highly reccomend that young writers check out Selecky's website as it is a wealth of wisdom on the writing life. You can even sign up for the letters she emails out twice a month which are full of writing insights.

Bird by Bird: Instructions on Writing and Life - Anne Lamott

I can't believe I didn't know about this writing book until a couple of years ago. I enjoy it a lot because Lamott really does mean it when she says the book is about writing AND life: she gives a lot of good advice about both. We writers seems to like our "writers therapy" or just griping about the writing life and this book appeals to that desire while also being really insightful.

Litreactor

I'll be honest, I haven't poked around into all the nooks and crannies of this literary website, and that's because it's packed with a lot of content. I first found out about it through author Chuck Palahniuk's tweets. The link I've given you will take you to the "Columns" part of the "Magazine" section for Litreactor, which has lots of cool articles for writers. The site does also offer space for writers to workshop their work and take online writing courses, but that content costs money unfortunately.

Zen in the Art of Writing - Ray Bradbury

I'm pretty sure it was my parents that bought me this book. It's a good over-all how-to book for writers. Bradbury covers a wide range of subjects, from finding your voice and developing your style as a writer, to some hints about the publishing world. He does it all with a great deal of passion for his craft and you can't help but love this quote from the book: "That’s the great secret of creativity. You treat ideas like cats: you make them follow you.” I like the notion of ideas as cats. It takes some work to get them to follow you, because sometimes they'd rather do anything than listen to whatever order you're trying to impose upon them. My last thought on this book: it's by freakin' Ray Bradbury, the guy's a legend so there's some guaranteed good advice in here.

Jani Krulc and the Flywheel Reading Series

by Emily - 0 Comment(s)

Last week I told you a bit more about our third place prize, a prize pack of books, but included in that is a chance to read at the Flywheel Reading Series, which I'll tell you a little bit more about. Also, I'd like to introduce you to Jani Krulc, a local author who has generously offerred her time for our second place prize, a one-on-one consultation with her.

Jani Krulc is a well-known figure within Calgary’s literary community. Her first collection of short fiction, entitled The Jesus Year, was released by Insomniac Press back in April, a brilliant book in which much of the tension in the stories comes from what is left unsaid between the characters. Jani has an MA in English from Concordia University and was a past fiction editor for Calgary’s experimental literary magazine filling Station.

Jani will be meeting with our second-place winner to talk with them about the story they've submitted with encouragement for what's already working well within the writing and where there's room for improvement. She will also be happy to answer any writing-related questions our second-place winner might have.

When speaking about her own teen writing Jani says, "I wrote some poetry as a teenager, but my interest was always in fiction. I wrote realist short stories throughout high school and used those stories to get into the creative writing program at the University of Calgary." Jani also has the following piece of advice for all you teen writers out there: "Read as much and as widely as you can and take risks with your writing - experiment, mimic your favourite authors, have fun."

So if you aren't lucky enough to win our Drink the Wild Air pass, or a consultation with Jani, don't worry because you still have a chance to win our third-place prize, a pack of books and the opportunity to read for 5-10 minutes at the March edition of filling Station magazine's Flywheel Reading Series. Flywheel happens on the second Thursday of every month at 7:30pm at Pages Bookstore on Kensington, one of our much-beloved independent bookstores. Flywheel is known for showcasing the work of talented local writers, but also hosts book launches for accomplished authors passing through town. This monthly reading series is piloted by local poet Natalie Simpson and has become a hub of the writing community, where writers of various levels gather together to socialize and listen to great literary talent. If you're a little bit unsure of your ability to perform your story, have no fear, I (Emily Ursuliak) am willing to provide coaching on doing a great reading, and I'll be there to support you on the night of the reading and introduce you to some really friendly, talented writers. Think of this as your introduction into Calgary's literary world.

Ok, that's all for now. I'll be posting in a couple of days about some great books and websites that should help inspire your writing.

Teen Writer's Toolkit: Getting Started

by Emily - 0 Comment(s)

So, you've found out about our Just Write contest and you're really excited to enter, maybe you've even settled on which one of the prompts you want to write about, or maybe you're going to be daring and try to incorporate both into your story. You're sitting there with your notebook open, pen hovering, or maybe you've just turned on your laptop and your fingers don't seem to want commit to the keys. You stare at the blank page before you for longer and longer, cold dread begins to ooze into your guts, your tongue feels thick and dry in your mouth. You can't seem to look away from that blank page, and you can't seem to begin to fill it and the harsh glare of its empty whiteness burns into your retinas. Ok, that was a bit melodramtic, but you know what I mean. It can be really hard to get started sometimes can't it? Well guess what, I can help you with that. The cool thing about getting to help out with this contest and write blogs about it is that I actually am a writer, and I feel like I have some helpful stuff to share with you since I'm a bit further down the road than you. But enough about me, let's get to those tricks I mentioned:

1. Make writing special for you.

What do I mean by this? Bribe yourself. I'm not kidding. What's my way of bribing myself? Well I posted a picture of all the "bribes" I've bought myself over the years just to the left here. I buy myself really nice notebooks that I often get from indie bookstores (Pages Books and Shelf Life carry some spiffy ones) but if you don't want to spend too much cash you can often find nice ones in dollar stores. I keep all of my writing books too. I sometimes like to imagine myself at eighty re-reading my writing books and thinking What on earth was I talking about?!

I couple my fancy writing book with a pen I really enjoy writing with. For me it's a fountain pen; I like the scratchy noise it makes as it flows across the paper. But maybe you have a pen that you already really enjoy writing with. Always write with that one. Just think about it, does some half-crumpled piece of looseleaf you found on your desk and a crummy pen that doesn't work properly seem appealing to write with now? Of course not. Also taking yourself on writing "dates" can help too. I take my writing book out to a nice coffe shop sometimes if I'm getting stuck. Having things like notebooks and trips to cafes makes you eager to start writing instead of dreading it.

2. Freewrite. Freewrite, freewrite, freewrite!

This is the trick I use the most. Freewriting just means that you aren't directly working on your project, rather you're writing about it. Often it takes the form of brainstorming, you throw some ideas out there like spaghetti and see what sticks to the wall. Sometimes for me it almost takes the form of "writer's therapy" where I complain about how terrible the new scene I wrote is, and I rant about that until I feel better and then eventually solutions begin to present themselves. The key to freewriting is to, well, be free about it. Write really fast and don't worry about grammar or spelling. Don't even stop to think. Sometimes I've come up with completely different angles to approach things from just by scribbling madly about it for ten minutes.

So there you are. Two tools to help get you started. I'll be posting about Jani Krulc and the Flywheel Reading Series next week and also be giving you another installment of the Teen Writer's Toolkit. So go find your note book and Just Write! (See what I did there? How I wittily worked the name of our contest into the sentence? That's how you know I'm a pro and not some hack.)

A Thank You to Our Local Authors

by Emily - 0 Comment(s)

As you've already heard, one of our prizes for the Just Write contest is a bag of books by local authors and literary organizations who graciously made this prize possible by donating their work. I wanted to not only thank these writers for their generosity, but also to introduce them and the books they’ve donated.

Rona Altrows

Rona writes fiction, essays, plays and occasionally even songs and has worked as both an in-house and freelance editor for a number of years. She has two books, A Run on Hose and Key in Lock, as well as the children's book The River Throws a Tantrum, was the co-editor of the Shy: An Anthology and has also had her work published in a number of highly-regarded journals, including Prairie Fire, The Malahat Review, and Ryga, and online in Montreal Serai.

Rona donated Key in Lock to us, a poignant collection of short stories. If you’d like to find out more about Rona, or the book she donated to us check out her website.

Dymphny Dronyk

Originally born in Amsterdam, Dymphny has written poetry, fiction and drama for over 25 years. She has a book of poetry, Contrary Infatuations, and a memoir about Alberta potter Bibi Clement, Bibi – A Life in Clay and has publications in a number of magazines and literary journals. With Edmonton poet Angela Kublik, she is also co-owner of House of Blue Skies, Alberta’s newest publisher, and co-editor of the anthologies Writing the Land – Alberta Through its Poets and Home & Away – Alberta’s Finest Poets Muse on the Meaning of Home, both bestsellers. Dymphny was kind enough to donate a copy of Home & Away – Alberta’s Finest Poets Muse on the Meaning of Home for our lucky winner.

Kim Firmston

Kim writes both fiction and plays. She mentors young writers through her work in her Reality is Optional Kid’s Writing Club, at WordsWorth Writing Camp and through the Dramantics Theatre Camp. Her short story, Life Before War, was short listed for the 2008 CBC Literary Award and published in FreeFall Magazine. She was written several plays for children, two of which were performed to a sold-out audience at the 2011 Calgary Fringe Festival.

Kim has kindly donated two of her teen fiction books to us, Touch and Boiled Cat. You can find out more about her at her website.

Jani Krulc

I'll be posting more about Jani next week as she is also doing our one-on-one consultation with our second place winner, but in the meantime I wanted to let you know that not only has she been generous enough to donate her time to meet with a young writer, but she's also given us a copy of her first collection of short fiction, The Jesus Year, to add to our prize pack.

Naomi Lewis

Naomi has written two books of fiction. Cricket in a Fist was her first novel and last year her short story collection I Know Who You Remind Me Of was released and was the winner of the Colophon Prize and was short-listed for the Alberta Reader’s Choice Award and the George Bugnet Award.

Naomi donated Shy: An Anthology which she co-edited with Rona Altrows. You can find out more about Shy and Naomi at her website.

Birk Sproxton

The late Birk Sproxton lived in Red Deer, Alberta where he wrote and taught creative writing at Red Deer College for over three decades. Birk wrote fiction, poetry and non-fiction and is the author of the following books: Headframe, The Hockey Fan Came Riding, The Red-Headed Woman with the Black Black Heart, Headframe: 2, and Phantom Lake: North of 54. He also was the editor of Trace: Prairie Writers on Writing, Sounds Assembling: The Poetry of Bertram Booker, The Winnipeg Connection: Writing Lives at Mid-Century and the short story collection Great Stories from the Prairies.

My thanks go out to Birk’s wife Lorraine, a dear friend, who donated both Headframe and Headframe: 2 to us. The literary journal Prairie Fire recently released a special issue dedicated to Birk and the legacy he left behind and Christian Riegel’s essay on Birk is a good place to start if you’d like to learn more about him.

filling Station

filling Station is Calgary’s experimental literary magazine that publishes inventive fiction, poetry and non-fiction. Entirely volunteer-fueled, the magazine has been in existence for twenty years and has published many highly regarded writers. filling Station has donated three issues of their magazine to our lucky winner. If you’d like to find out more about the magazine, and perhaps even how you can volunteer or get involved, check out their website. It’s also worth noting that the Central library has copies of this magazine available for you to check out or you can pick it up at any independent book store in Calgary.

Migratory Words

Migratory Words is a writers' collective operating in Canmore, Alberta. The regular group of locals is augmented by visits from iconic Canadian authors, seduced into keeping our company by the grace of our glorious surrounds. Each year, Migratory Words Press releases an anthology of work shared during our fortnightly circles. In 2013, Migratory Words has celebrated five years with a new anthology and a new format. Contributing Authors include Weyman Chan, Sid Marty, Erin Dingle, Carolyn Yates, Charles Noble, Tim Murphy and many more!

Migratory Words was founded by poet David Eso who generously donated a copy of their recent anthology to us. Find out a bit more about David here.


WordsWorth

Our final book donation came to us from Lisa Murphy-Lamb, WordsWorth's generous director, who provided an anthology of the work of WordsWorth students from last year. I'll be posting a special blog post on WordsWorth's sister writing camp, the Drink the Wild Air Writing Retreat in a couple of weeks, so stay tuned for that!

I hope finding out about all of the diverse writers and literary organizations who have donated copies of their books for this prize has made you all the more eager to enter our contest. There's sort of a bonus to all of the prizes and that's that this bag of books, and the other prizes you have a chance of winning, came about because the literary community here is pretty awesome. I put out a call to the writing community to see what I could offer for prizes and they were all too happy to help out. So the bonus is this, even though none of these writers know you, they donated these books to you because they care about you. They wanted to play a part in helping you develop as a writer and that's a pretty big gift, knowing that you're the next generation of a writing community that really cares about each other. So do me a favour if you win these books, come out to literary events because we'd love to see you, and if you see any of these writers thank them, and tell them what their book meant to you. It will mean a lot to them, it really will.

In a couple of days I'll be posting my first in a series of "Teen Writer's Toolkit" blogs to help you get started with your story. Make sure you mark that contest deadline on your calendar: January 25th, 2014!

Just Write Teen Fiction Writing Contest

by Carrie - 10 Comment(s)

New year, new contest! If you resolved to be a better writer this year, we have a great way to get you started and help you improve your craft.

I’m proud to announce our brand new teen fiction writing contest – Just Write. We have fantastic prizes lined up, including a spot at a weekend writer’s retreat for teens, a one-on-one mentoring session with a local author, a chance to read your work at the flywheel Reading Series, and book prize packs (of course!).

Ready to write? Here’s how it works.

The Prizes:

  • A spot at Drink the Wild Air, a weekend writing retreat for teens run by Young Alberta Writers (Feb. 21-23 at Kamp Kiwanis).
  • A one-on-one mentoring session with local author Jani Krulc.
  • A prize pack of teen books and works by local authors, along with the chance to read at the March session of the flywheel Reading Series put on by filling Station magazine (March 13th at Pages on Kensington).

The Prompts:

To know what was in the shop you had to go inside; the patina of dust on the front window was thick, but once I thought I made out the shape of an owl on the other side of the glass, its wings lifted in frozen flight. (The sentence)

writing prompt

(The picture)

The Rules:

  • This contest is for teens, ages 13-17.
  • You MUST use at least one of the two writing prompts provided above – your work will either include the sentence provided, or be based on the picture (or both).
  • Entries must be no longer than 500 words. Prose, poetry, and graphic/comic formats are all welcome (graphic formats must include some writing).
  • Send your entries to teenservices@calgarypubliclibrary.com by the end of Saturday, January 25th, 2014.
  • Winners will be chosen by a panel of judges and announced at Calgary Public Library's Writer's Weekend on Saturday, February 1st, 2014.

The End.

YAC Reviews: Parallel

by Carrie - 0 Comment(s)

yac reviews

parallelParallel by Lauren Miller

Review by Vyoma

I loved this book because of its eminent vocabulary, cosmic benefaction, and plot. The end really was a cliffhanger and the book was very enjoyable to read. Abby Barnes had a plan – she would go to college, major in journalism and have a job before she turned twenty-two. However, one single choice – deciding to take a drama class in her senior year of high school changed everything. Because of a cosmic collision, she is living in a parallel world. There is another Abby Barnes in another world, however that Abby Barnes took an astronomy class in her senior year. With the help of her friend Caitlin, Abby attempts to set things right without losing sight of who she is, the boy who most probably is her soul mate, and a sensible destiny. This book made me realize the importance of proper decision making, as even the tiniest choice that we make may have big consequences.

Rainbow Rowell Interview & Giveaway

by Carrie - 9 Comment(s)

fangirl

2013 was Rainbow Rowell's year, with not one but two YA novels getting some major buzz. Eleanor & Park reminded John Green what it was like to fall in love with a book, and made quite a few of the year-end "best of 2013" lists. For my money, her second book, Fangirl, was even better - but I guess you'll have to read them both and decide for yourself. Read on for our interview with my new favourite author, Rainbow Rowell, and leave your name & contact info in the comments for a chance to win your very own copy of Fangirl!

Q: I wanted to start by just telling you how very much I loved Fangirl – as soon as I was done I wanted to start reading it again! It’s been a long time since I felt as connected to a character as I did to Cather. How much of Cath did you pull from your own experience?

A: Thank you so much!

There’s a lot of me in Cath. I was also terrified to leave home for college. I had decided not to, actually – then a friend from high school said she’d be my roommate. Cath’s social anxiety, her fear of change, her desire to escape into fiction – those are all mine.

And of all my characters, Cath is closest to who I am as a writer. We both love to write dialogue. We both worry that we won’t have anything new to say. And we both crave collaboration.

Q: You’ve said on your blog and in interviews that you always create a playlist when you start writing a book – what’s the connection between your music and your writing?

A: The playlists help me stay emotionally consistent when I write. Sometimes I use a specific song to help keep me inside a scene, even if it takes a few days or weeks to write it. The song becomes an emotional anchor for me.

Also, I build the playlists as I write – and I usually make one for each main character – so I’m always thinking about the emotional arc of story as I go along.

You can see all of my Eleanor & Park playlists on my blog! I’ll be posting Fangirl playlists soon.

Q: There’s this great line in Fangirl: “Sometimes writing is running downhill, your fingers jerking behind you on the keyboard the way your legs do when they can’t quite keep up with gravity” (p.396) – is that what it’s like for you? Can you tell us a bit about your writing process?

A: Thank you. That is what it’s like for me. Exactly. Pretty much everything Cath says about writing is how I feel, too.

I have to really focus when I write. For four to six hours at a time, for four to six days in a row. I don’t like to have any other commitments on those days, if I can help it. My goal is to submerge myself in the story and stay there as long I can without coming up for air.

rainbow rowell

I’ve written all of my books so far in coffee shops, but I’m trying to write at home now that my kids are in school all day.

Q: Your first book, Attachments, was published as an adult book, and Eleanor & Park and Fangirl are both YA; was it a conscious decision for you to write YA, or is that just where those stories seemed to belong?

A: It wasn’t a conscious decision. When I started Eleanor & Park, I didn’t even realize I was writing a YA novel; it was just, “This is the story I want to tell.” I was a bit more savvy when I wrote Fangirl. By that time, I’d sold Eleanor & Park as YA, and I was working with a YA editor.

I love writing books about teenagers – and I love that teenagers are finding my books. (I really love the YA community.) But I don’t shift my approach to the story based on who might read it. It’s always: Get inside the characters’ heads, try to make it feel real.

Q: It seems to me that the reaction to Eleanor & Park has been all about extremes – John Green loved it (seriously, how much did you freak out when you heard that JOHN GREEN loved your book?!), and then there were the parents who hated it enough to get you banned from a planned author reading (and they’re still trying to get it banned from the area libraries, AND punish the librarians who recommended it – and you – in the first place). What do you think it is that makes people react so strongly to this story?

A: That’s a good question – and I’m not sure I can answer it. I mean, I was feeling extreme things when I was writing Eleanor & Park. The story definitely came out of me in an extreme way. (I felt gripped by it.) But it was still a huge surprise when people responded so passionately to the book. I never would have predicted that.

As for what happened to the book in Minnesota, I hate to give too much weight to that controversy. The negative response there came from one child’s parent. That parent was able to rally support and eventually influence the school and county boards -- but it was such an unusual and unprecedented response to the book.

Q: You have a new book, Landline, coming out this spring – can you tell us a bit about it?

A: Yes! I’m very excited about Landline. It’s another adult book (not YA) and it comes out in July 2014 from St. Martin's Press. Here’s the pitch:

Georgie McCool knows her marriage is in trouble. That it’s been in trouble for a long time. She still loves her husband, Neal, and Neal still loves her, deeply — but that almost seems besides the point now.

Maybe that was always besides the point.

Two days before they’re supposed to visit Neal’s family in Omaha for Christmas, Georgie tells Neal that she can’t go. She’s a TV writer, and something’s come up on her show; she has to stay in Los Angeles. She knows that Neal will be upset with her — Neal is always a little upset with Georgie — but she doesn’t expect to him to pack up the kids and go home without her.

When her husband and the kids leave for the airport, Georgie wonders if she’s finally done it. If she’s ruined everything.

That night, Georgie discovers a way to communicate with Neal in the past. It’s not time travel, not exactly, but she feels like she’s been given an opportunity to fix her marriage before it starts . . .

Is that what she’s supposed to do?

Or would Georgie and Neal be better off if they never got married at all?

You can see the cover for Landline here.

Q: Apart from your own work, what books or authors would you recommend to a YA reader?

A: I really love Cynthia Voigt. I read Homecoming in college, then inhaled everything she'd written about the Tillerman family. (There's a Dicey Tillerman reference in Eleanor & Park.)

I also love The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman and The Magicians by Lev Grossman . . . . Those books are hard to categorize, but I think you could call them YA.

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins is my favorite YA love story. Where She Went by Gayle Forman was impossible for me to put down. And Will Grayson Will Grayson (David Levithan/John Green) has my favorite YA character – Tiny Cooper.

eleanor & park dicey's songgraveyard bookthe magiciansanna and the french kisswhere she wentwill grayson

This contest is now closed - congratulations to our winner, Rina!

Zinio for Teens

by Courtney N - 0 Comment(s)

Calgary Public Library recently added Zinio, an online database that grants members access to hundreds of free magazines, to its E-Library. Members can download an unlimited number of magazines for free and keep them forever.

For those of you who have a long bus ride to school, you can download magazines the night before and read them on your phone or tablet on the way to school. Once magazines are downloaded, Wi-Fi is no longer required to read the magazines. Anyone traveling over the holidays or for spring graduation trips can make use of this feature, too.

There are just a few simple steps to accessing Zinio and you can read about getting started here: http://calgarypubliclibrary.com/books-more/ebooks/zinio

While there are over 350 magazines you can access with your library card, here are a few teen-worthy recommendations:

Nylon

Car and Driver

Seventeen

Rolling Stone

Sportsnet Magazine

Transworld Snowboarding

Popular Science

Zinio

YA Lit Pick — December

by Monique - 0 Comment(s)

 

While her parents are on an extended vacation over the summer, Kiri is left to her own devices. She plans to spend time with her best friend/bandmate/crush Lucas making music and competing in battle of the bands. She also plans on practicing the piano since she is quiet accomplished and wants to improve her skills even further. This all changes one fateful day, when she receives a call from a stranger who has her sister's belongings. The problem is that her sister died 5 years ago. It isn't until after she picks up her sister's belongings that Kiri learns how her sister actually died.

This debut novel, draws you into Kiri's life as she learns about family secrets, her relationship with Lucas and about herself. I found myself drawn to this book and wanting to know if Kiri would be ok, if she would sink or swim in the end. Although I throughly enjoyed the novel, I found that I was disappointed in the ending. It left several questions unanswered for me. Don't get me wrong, that is a good thing as it could lead to many possible conclusions. I'm looking forward to reading other material that Hilary T. Smith publishes in the future.

 

 

 

 

Victorian Girl Spies!

by Carrie - 0 Comment(s)

a spy in the houseI'm thrilled to announce that award-winning Canadian YA author Y.S. Lee is visiting CPL next week, and two lucky fans at each reading will win signed copies of her latest book, Traitor in the Tunnel!

Ms. Lee writes really excellent historical mystery/adventure and has so far published three books in The Agency series, with another one on the way. It's hard to find proper historical fiction in YA lit - not steampunk, not paranormal, no time travel - I love all of those things but sometimes you just want to immerse yourself in days gone by, the way they actually were.

Travel with me back to Victorian London and meet Mary Quinn - she's twelve years old and about to be executed for thievery, until a last minute rescue finds her instead ending up at Miss Scrimshaw's Academy for Girls. Finding herself alive is extraordinary enough, but to be given an honest chance at a good education and a real, worthwhile life is even more amazing. At age seventeen, Mary discovers that her school is also a cover for an all-female investigative agency, and that is the beginning of a life that is quite simply astonishing, full of adventure, peril, and the chance to make a real difference in the world.

I have loved The Agency series since the first book came out; the historical detail is spot-on, and the characters are engaging and many-faceted. I admit that a Victorian girl spy agency is probably not exactly the way things were, but it's within the realm of possibilty, and Y.S. Lee will have you convinced that it's the way it should have been.

Y.S. Lee will be at two library locations on Thursday, November 28th:

Crowfoot Library, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m

Village Square Library, 2 - 3 p.m.

Register now or just drop by; if you would like her to sign a book, please bring your own.

This program is generously sponsored by the Canada Council for the Arts.

body at the towertraitor in the tunnel

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