You are here: Home > Blogs > Writer's Nook

Latest Posts

Off Line

Select another pool to see the results

    New in the Nook, September Edition

    by Phil - 0 Comment(s)

    Another interesting batch of new arrivals to report!

    The 4th floor of the Central library is keeping an eye on all the latest resources for writers and we set them aside in the "physical" version of the Writer's Nook, where you will find everything you need to get inspired and informed to keep your writing projects moving forward.

    Wired for Story: the writer's guide to using brain science to hook readers from the very first sentence by Lisa Cron

    Imagine knowing what the brain craves from every tale it encounters, what fuels the success of any great story, and what keeps readers transfixed. Wired for Story reveals these cognitive secrets-and it's a game-changer for anyone who has ever set pen to paper. (Summary)

    Science can reveal new perspectives, but just as often it shows us what we already know. The study of narrative as a powerful force that can do more than entertain is a perfect example of how neuroscience validates what writers -and readers- already sense: we are hardwired to love a story because it allows us to make sense of the world. Cron (Extension Writers' Program, UCLA) draws on her extensive experience in publishing, story consultancy, and television to elucidate not just how to write well but how to tell a story. While the brain science element can come off as a bit gimmicky as Cron shares her "secrets," it's the only flaw in a marvelous examination of key writing concepts such as plot, tone, theme, timing, conflict, subplot, and setup. Cron shows how these elements work to keep the narrative unfolding while moving it along, with patterns and parallels connecting the reader to the whole story. Practical, useful, and well organized, this enjoyable book provides a framework of questions for writers to ask themselves. This book will be well received by both aspiring and established writers. (Library Journal Review)

    The 6.5 Practices of Moderately Successful Poets by Jeffrey Skinner

    A private eye turned moderately successful poet leads readers on a satiric, hopeful tour of how to make a life in the arts, while still having a life. Revealing, hilarious, and peppered with sly takes on the ins and outs of contemporary American poetry.

    Revision is the process a poem endures to become its best self.
    Or, if you are the poet, you are the process a poem endures to become its best self. [...]

    Endures because a first draft, like all other objects in the universe, has inertia and would prefer to stay where it is. The poet must not collaborate.
    Best
    self because the poem is more like a person than a thing, and does not strenuously object to personification.
    Yo, poem.
    But let's not get carried away. It's your poem and you can treat it as you wish; sweet talk it; push it around if that's what it takes. Alfred Hitchcock notoriously said of the actors in his movies, "They are cattle."

    Tags:

    Comments

    This Post Comments RSS 2.0
    No Comments

    Add a Comment

    *
     
     
    *