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    Screenwriting 101

    by Phil - 0 Comment(s)

    We are now 7 sleeps away from Writers' Weekend 2014 so I thought we ought to take a look at one of the more specialized, unique presentations this year has to offer. Screenwriting 101 will take the stage from 2 - 3pm, promising an inspirational introduction to the form. Our presenter is Geo Takach, an award winning filmmaker, author, script consultant, and instructor that we are thrilled to be hosting.

    Unlike many forms of writing that require nothing more than a blank sheet and a pen to get started, the art of screenwriting requires a certain knowledge and framework to have a chance at success. Other than a brief attempt to make sense of Final Draft software I have no idea what tricks and rules and format a screenwriter must know to produce their work. Which is exactly what Writers' Weekend is all about - inspirational guidance from someone who does know.

    Whether you are an experienced writer, perhaps looking to polish up a submission for the WGA's Alberta Screenwriters Initiative, or a beginner full of ideas without the proper container to work them out, come to Writers' Weekend 2014 and connect with the information you need to keep moving forward. One hour with Mr. Takach, of course, cannot possibly cover all the ground aspiring screenwriters might need flattened out. In between the presentations on February 1st visit the Writers' Weekend Resource Fair - a gauntlet of local literary groups in the theatre lobby - and we'll work together to get the answers you need. In the meantime, here are some of the library's newest titles under the heading of "Motion Picture Authorship". Homework!

    The 21st Century Screenplay, by Linda Aronson

    The 21st-Century Screenplay is a comprehensive and highly practical screen-writing manual. It covers classic to avant-garde scripts, from The African Queen and Tootsie to 21 Grams, Pulp Fiction, Memento, and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Whether you want to write features, shorts, adaptations, genre films, ensemble films, blockbusters, or art house movies, this book is your road map, it takes you all the way from choosing a brilliant idea to plotting, writing, and rewriting a successful script. Featuring a range of insider survival tips on creativity under pressure, time-effective writing, and rising to the challenge of international competitions, The 21st-Century Screenplay is essential reading for newcomers and veterans alike.

    Essentials of Screenwriting, by Richard Walter

    Hollywood's premier teacher of screenwriting shares the secrets of writing and selling successful screenplays. His students have written more than ten projects for Steven Spielberg alone, plus hundreds of other Hollywood blockbusters and prestigious indie productions, including two recent Oscar winners for best original screenplay. In this updated edition, Walter integrates his highly coveted lessons and principles with material from his companion text, The Whole Picture, and includes new advice on how to turn a raw idea into a great movie or TV script - and sell it. There is never a shortage of aspiring screenwriters, and this book is their bible.

    Story, by Robert McKee

    Robert McKee's screenwriting workshops have earned him an international reputation for inspiring novices, refining works in progress and putting major screenwriting careers back on track. Writers, producers, development executives and agents all flock to his lecture series, praising it as a mesmerizing and intense learning experience. In Story, McKee expands on the concepts he teaches in his $450 seminars (considered a must by industry insiders), providing readers with the most comprehensive, integrated explanation of the craft of writing for the screen. No one better understands how all the elements of a screenplay fit together, and no one is better qualified to explain the "magic" of story construction and the relationship between structure and character than Robert McKee.

    **book descriptions lifted from the library catalogue

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