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  • Nov 26 - Distinguished Visitor - Shyam Selvadurai presents 'Writing from the Hyphen' this Saturday
  • Nov 19 - Writing Rogues & Rascals - One more chance to get some work done with the Library's 2014 Writer In Residence, Rosemary Nixon
  • Nov 5 - Come Write In - At home where the Wrimotaurs roam
  • Oct 31 - One Book - Marcello Di Cintio launches One Book One Calgary this Saturday
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    Rosemary Nixon

    by Phil - 0 Comment(s)

    September through the end of November is a special time at Memorial Park Library. For three glorious months Calgary Public Library cardholders have access to the guidance and expertise of their very own Writer in Residence. If you haven't taken advantage of this wonderful service in the past, go directly to our 2014 Writer-in-Residence page to meet this year's resident - Rosemary Nixon.

    Not only does this program offer Calgary's aspiring writers free manuscript consultation, but also ninety days of public programs designed to inspire, teach, and connect. Registration for Rosemary's workshops, presentations, and readings will begin next Monday, August 18, and are likely going to fill up quick.

    For individual manuscript consultation, we can begin submitting work at Memorial Park Library after September 1, according to the submission guidelines. Two weeks later, on Thursday, September 18, join us for the 2014 Writer in Residence "Welcome & Program Launch" as we kick things off at historic Memorial Park Library. Starting at 7 p.m. Rosemary will read from a selection of her works and outline plans for her residency. A reception will follow.

    As always with the delicate act of absorbing writing wisdom from a professional, knowing a teacher's work will multiply a student's grasp by inordinate amounts. To get the most out of this year's Writer in Residence, here's your homework:

    Are You Ready to be Lucky?

    Are You Ready to Be Lucky? If so, meet Roslyn, a spirited divorcée eager for new beginnings.

    Meet Duncan, a British conman with a penchant for collecting ex-wives. Meet Floyd, a hard-living contractor who can fix anyone’s house but his own. Irritating, vulnerable, hopeful, they ricochet off one another, trailing a mess of family and friends, all of them trying to beat the odds and find happiness. With razor-sharp wit, Rosemary Nixon takes on the chaos and absurdity of friendship, marriage, divorce, and betrayal—and the heart-pounding, breathtaking, always astonishing complexities of luck and love.

    Kalila

    Kalila chronicles the lives of Maggie and Brodie, whose joy collides with devastation when their daughter’s birth also heralds the news of her congenital heart condition.

    In this startlingly inventive novel, Rosemary Nixon braids light and darkness into a narrative chain pulled exquisitely taut. Through Maggie and Brodie’s shifting viewpoints; the isolating impenetrability of hospital life; and the mediation of physics, music, and family, Nixon propels the reader into unmapped emotional terrain where a shell-shocked family grapples with the horror, joy, and mystery of impermanence. The result is a spellbinding tale, provocative for the emotions and the intellect.

    The Cock's Egg

    Magic and witchcraft are as much a part of the African landscape as are ghostly white egrets fluttering into blue jungle clearings, or copper-coloured frangipani blossoms growing against white-washed mud walls. Dislocation, isolation, and desire are hauntingly encompassed in these wonderful stories of Canadians living in a foreign landscape. And always the witchcraft of the cock’s egg shapes myths, permeates lives, and maps a country whose changing face finds its inhabitants stealing power through the transformation of the body.

    *Available only in Central Library's CHFH Local History room.

    Mostly Country

    With this first collection of short stories, Rosemary Nixon’s Wadden joins Manawaka and Agassiz on the landscape of Canadian fiction. Wadden, where farm and town, church and post office draw the limits of experience and escape. In prose of unnerving clarity, the individual lives of interwoven families unfold and overlap. There are: Fay Leichty, who lives at the very centre of the community in shamed silence; Kevin McClancy, unable to cross the boundaries of the Mennonite church and family; Rita Steckley, who during an encounter with a boy and the town tough, discovers the cruelties of desire. And many more. Through memory, through fantasy, through differing versions of events and places as far away as Zaire, Mostly Country creates the people of Wadden. A reading experience to be enjoyed.

    *Available only in Central Library's CHFH Local History room.

    *book summaries lifted off rosemarynixon.com

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